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Let’s talk about Spam!

Salt n Pepa

 
Don’t get me wrong.. Email was one of the cornerstones of the internet, some might even argue that replacing postal mail might have driven the early growth of the internet?

 
So email is a fundamental part of the internet, and yet.. Just because YOU can do something, like emailing wonderful offers, does it make it right? If everyone sat around all day doing that would it be sustainable?

So we come to the topic of email spam, it’s actual cost in terms of how it taxes our time/effort to dislodge from our inboxes, and what people can do about it.

- Never buy a service that’s spam-vertized.

This is a simple one. You wouldn’t donate money to someone who’s proposing to stand outside your house and scream offers at you through the window, so why would you invest your earnings in a product advertised to you via unsolicited means?

- Identify spam without wasting time.

We’re an SEO, so if you send across an offer to help the Beanstalk SEO website rank better, I’m pretty sure I can toss your email into the spam bin and forget about it. In fact anyone who just sends you an SEO email out of the blue must be pretty desperate and incapable of ranking their own sites in order to get the traffic they need to stay in business.

I personally keep a list of these domains, mostly to block them from using our contact forms, but also as a reference of companies to avoid when clients need referrals.

Heck even “www.google.com” gets similar offers to improve their ‘conversions’ and ‘organic search results’!

Over on Matt Cutt’s blog he’s talking about a lot of email issues and he’s taken the time to laugh at SEO e-mail spam:

I was on your website www.google.com and wanted to shoot you a quick note. I think I can make a few changes (aesthetically and/or SEO – wise) to make your site convert more visitors into leads and to get it placed higher in the organic search results, for a few of the select terms.

This is NOT like one of those foreign emails you probably get in your inbox every day. Just to be upfront I have 3 agents that work with me for development /SEO.

I would just need to know which (if not both) services you’re open to checking out information about, either web design or SEO. Would you be open to seeing more brief info / quote for what I would like to accomplish?

As Matt Cutts summarized on his blog:

“this person is offering help to convert Google.com visitors into leads.
Or, you know, to improve Google.com’s rankings in organic search results. Sigh.”

 

- Use Opt-In lists that are re-checked regularly.

When you give people a chance to ‘opt-in’ to a mail campaign you win all around…

  • reach people who are interested
  • annoy less potential clients
  • avoid getting flagged as a spammer
  • spend less time trying to sell your validity
  • make the online world a better place

Keep in mind that one of the largest (if not the largest) anti-spam providers is Postini, which is now run by Google and used by many organizations from GMail to WordPress.

If you run afoul of Postini then you can expect a VERY LARGE group of listeners, including GMail users/blog readers, to be filtering out your messages, spam or not.

So even if you have a great opt-in audience now, make sure to re-check that list before it gets stale and potentially starts to annoy folks that were previously interested.

I would NEVER forward spam to friends/associates, but if someone I know is interested in something well-maintained that I’ve opted into, I’ll recommend it to them for sure.

Food for thought.. to go along with that Salt n Pepa!

SEO news blog post by @ 1:38 pm on September 20, 2013


 

Twitter’s Musical Magic

This weekend I attended a local music festival called Rifflandia. This epic four-day event featured over 170 artists, performing at fourteen venues all around the city—everyone from mainstage bigwigs like Courtney Love to beloved local acts that draw a small but dedicated crowd. On Thursday night, while watching the next band set up and do sound checks, I went to update Twitter on my phone and my new friend smirked. “You use Twitter?” he asked. “Why? I’ve never understood the appeal.”

©Rifflandia, 2013

©Rifflandia, 2013

It’s unfortunate for him, because events like Rifflandia are the exact place where Twitter shows its true strength. It takes those big moments—like a Courtney Love concert or a surprise encore performance of Bear Mountain—and makes everyone a part of the collective experience. We uploaded photos and video, made plans to meet with friends old and new, and got up-to-date information on which venues were at capacity. Through the network of thousands using the hashtag #Riff2013, we shared our collective experiences and were able to be many places at once.

One particularly poignant usage of social media to connect with fans was on display at the performance of the Montreal band Stars, who are a personal favourite of mine. In the hours leading up to their main stage set, they spread the word that the audience should film the band and themselves during the concert singing along to the song “Hold On When You Get Love and Let Go When You Give It”, and upload the video to their SwitchCam streaming video feed. The files will be used to create a crowd-sourced music video for the song, to be aired on CBC. Even though it was pouring rain, hundreds of us held up our smartphones and became videographers for a few minutes. It was an absolutely wonderful way to connect with fans, and we felt like part of the band’s family; our perspectives as music lovers were becoming a vital part of their newest album.

It’s not just the concert experience that’s enhanced by Twitter; it’s also been an invaluable tool for me as a radio host and aspiring journalist. I can attest to the fact that a personal outreach to someone on Twitter can make all the difference when it comes to getting an ‘in’ with that person elsewhere; I’ve made dozens of musician friends and connections on Twitter, and parlayed it into bringing a local musician into the radio station with me for a live show and cohosting event. It all happened because I saw them at a show, followed them, and sent a message praising their talent and asking if I could obtain their songs to play on my show. After some back-and-forth, a legitimate working relationship has emerged.

It was tough to explain all of this in just a short sentence to my friend, or anyone else who smirks at my heavy use of Twitter, but I wouldn’t trade it with anything. Becoming an SEO has only increased my knowledge of just how powerful the social network can be; it’s the best networking method for introverted oddballs like me, as well as people from all industries and demographic groups. I’m not surprised that Twitter has announced a new partnership with the advertisers of big television and live events, because live-tweeting the experience is half of the fun and it’s the perfect way to catch your audience in a direct, relateable manner.

SEO news blog post by @ 11:56 am on September 17, 2013


 

Facebook’s Contest Rules: NOW They Change Things!

This summer I put together a Facebook contest for a client. Up until last week, the social media’s site rules were explicitly clear: absolutely no promotion-related content could be administered within Facebook itself. If you wanted to make a promotion, you had to build it on a third-party app developer and host it as a tab on your page. Users could not enter by commenting on a post; likes could not count as votes. While my contest was a fantastic learning experience, the actual process—researching what Facebook would and wouldn’t expect, vetting third-party developers, trying to design and program the tab itself—was complicated and sometimes frustrating.

likeFacebook has now revamped its contest guidelines. The biggest change has been the removal of the third-party administration requirement; while it’s one alteration, it has massive ramifications for how businesses conduct themselves and interact with their fans. A comment, post, or like can now function as an entry or a vote; while third-party apps can still be used for larger campaigns, it can make the process of a quick giveaway or draw much simpler—as easy as just posting an update and asking for comments. This is obviously a big plus for page owners; fans are more likely to enter a giveaway where all they have to do is comment or like. It also becomes a great deal cheaper to host a promotion; while contests can be real business-builders, the app developers often charge a subscription fee for use of their service and may only offer a bare-bones free option, if any.

So the changes are a good thing for small businesses and pages looking to increase their traffic by doing giveaways and contests. Facebook still encourages the use of apps for larger and more personalized experiences; they also forbid pages from asking users to take part in promotions by liking or posting something to their own personal Timeline. And if I’d only done this client contest a few months later, I would have very possibly been able to pull it off quicker than I did (though I would have missed the opportunity to become truly acquainted with Photoshop).

That said, there are some legal ramifications for this change that will be interesting to follow as the new rules go into practice. For one, entry management may become a great deal more difficult; while the apps are very good at keeping track of exactly who enters the contest and what they must do, it could easily become a hassle to ensure each entry was legitimate when you’re just asking people to like a post. Furthermore, it can run up against official location rules; if the giveaway is tailored to the sweepstakes rules for The United States and the winner is in Britain, their legal claim to the prize—and the legality of their participation in the first place—may not be simple.

With apps, page owners must make clear exactly what counts as an entry and how the winners will be chosen. The US has very strict rules which dictate that all entries into a sweepstakes or draw must have an equal chance of winning. But if users can enter through a variety of actions, it can be difficult to track them; it also removes Facebook’s careful denial of liability, which had been so prominent in the earlier rules.

I’m interested to see how these rule changes will work out in the long run. While it’ll make things much easier for a lot of businesses, I can see many ways where things can go wrong, and the results remain to be seen. Until then, you can enter that draw for free wings without worry. Go forth and like to your heart’s content

SEO news blog post by @ 11:58 am on September 4, 2013


 

The Elephant Beneath My Feet

Using social media as a way to generate strategy and effective business plays a mighty role in our digital world. Many clients are concerned with how the big brand names are stuffing smaller labels under their feet by pushing them to the next page on Google. We should recognize that social media is here for a reason and can be harnessed to drive sales and traffic to the smaller label. The benefits of harnessing social media range from generating long lasting impressions, creating community and relationships and also connecting to clients. Dave Davies had mentioned that at the end of the day it’s creating traffic and making that decent pay check.

How do I generate long lasting impressions with social media?

In early 2010 Blendtec, one of the leading blender companies, used shock-com marketing to create long lasting impressions. The “Will it Blend” You Tube series used everything from an iPad to iPhone and blended it up. Owning an iPad at the time was a must have, but throwing it in the blender was inconceivable. Why would anybody do that? Blendtec did and it clearly showed that it could pulverize. It also created an impression that was virally shared, counting beyond the millions and bringing home economic growth. This type of campaigning has been around for centuries, like how Edison electrocuted an elephant as a propaganda campaign against Tesla. We all know how that worked for Edison. The truth is, we don’t have to go as far as electrocuting an elephant, but we can use this technique to conquer the elephant (Box Stores) with an internet impression.

When business enters the digital world it doesn’t mean you toss out old school networking ideals. When a brick and mortar business opens its door for the first time it focuses on its community and begins to build relationships within it. This connects their store and ensures credibility for their products as well as service. If a small business is accepted well within its own community people begin to speak highly of it. Word of mouth can have a positive impact or a negative impact, but it can happen fast. When a website connects with their clients using social media they gain credibility, and if that client is happy it’s easy enough to hit that share button. This kind of word of mouth happens at a relatively faster pace, with an even larger number of people reached. You can now take hundreds of individuals and focus that feeling of being personally catered to. All this can be a benefit by giving the small brand a voice in its community and avoid being crushed by the popular giant.

Big corporate companies don’t have to rid the local mom and pop store in regards to penguin and panda. It’s about playing smart and using the same techniques that were used in the days before the internet. Be personable when creating a community and relationships, but also never fear going out of your comfort zone to create a long lasting impression. Develop that traffic, spike that interest and make that decent check at the end of the day. Soon enough your presence will strengthen and you will hold that elephant beneath your foot.

SEO news blog post by @ 2:00 pm on August 16, 2013


 

Twitter’s New Anti-Abuse Policies and the Dark Side of Social Media

I won’t lie when I say that one of the best parts of my job is managing social media accounts; it can be legitimately fun, but it’s also a very important illustration of how the Internet affects customer/business interactions. My experience mostly comes from being a voracious and active social media user in my private life; I enjoy a following of 400+ people on Twitter, and I have seen what the network is capable of: live-blogging the Vancouver Olympic opening ceremonies, catching cheating politicians in the act, and spreading the word of everything from hot TV shows to full-blown revolutions. While some might resist it, social media is vital for modern reputation management and customer service; the web has democratized marketing in a very drastic way, making it nearly impossible for a company to cover up substantial issues with their products or service. When you do a great job, you might get the occasional positive mention; when you mess up, your customers will definitely air their grievances. And as a social media user myself, I can vouch for the fact that the public has come to respect businesses that address these issues honestly when they’re contacted about them.

Unfortunately, this democratization has lead to some inevitable abuses of the system. In some cases it’s a rival company posting fake reviews in an attempt to discredit the competition; in others, a company (or person) may be the subject of a vicious complaint that goes viral online. Part of online reputation management is being able to mitigate these issues, whether by reporting abuse to site moderators or addressing complaints head-on.

I say all of this because some business owners on desktop and Android platforms may see a new feature on Twitter in the coming weeks: an in-tweet ‘Report Abuse’ button. Currently, users who wish to flag threats must visit the online help center and go through several extra steps to report abuse; the new button will make the process far quicker, and (hopefully) hasten the removal of hate speech. Twitter’s announcement wasn’t just a routine update; it was spurred largely by a British woman named Caroline Criado-Perez, and the flood of horrific rape, violence, and bomb threats she received over the weekend. These weren’t mere trolls; the abuse got so serious that at least one man was arrested on Sunday as a result. What did Criado-Perez do to warrant hundreds of 140-character threats of violence? She campaigned—successfully—for the British government to put author Jane Austen’s face on the new £10 banknote. The threats were also sent to a female Member of Parliament who tweeted her support for the campaign.

If it seems absurd, that’s because it is; this wasn’t a case of radical politics or controversial opinion, but a fairly tame move to represent more British women on currency. The horrifying result was a stark reminder of the abusive power of social media, especially against women and other marginalized groups in society. But even if you’re not an active participant in social issues online, it’s intimidating to realize just how quickly the anonymous web can turn against you. While some have applauded Twitter for finally taking a decisive action to make their website safer for all users, the decision has also drawn criticism from people who have seen how ‘Report Abuse’ functions on other websites have actually been used against legitimate accounts as a form of abuse in and of itself; a group of trolls flagging an account they disagree with can result in that account being suspended by the website, even when the owner hasn’t actually violated any rules.

Of course, the gender politics and personal vendettas of social media are quite a bit more intense than what we do as SEOs to help clients. In terms of reputation management online, the Report Abuse button will likely be a helpful way to ensure that a company doesn’t suffer from malicious treatment. However, it also may be far too easy to report a dissatisfied (and vocal) customer out of sheer frustration. Online reputation is a fickle beast; a few damning reviews can take down an entire small business, and the damage can be very difficult to control—it’s easy to feel helpless when it seems like nothing you do can push down a few dissatisfied customers in favor of the happy ones. Business owners on Twitter should still make it a priority to engage with unhappy customers on a personal level, rather than just report an account because of a particularly bad review—even if it makes the problem temporarily disappear, the Internet is not kind to those types of tactics.

The Criado-Perez debacle over the weekend has shown Twitter’s dark side, particularly when it comes to misogyny and online gender violence. The effect of the new reporting feature remains to be seen in that regard. While smaller businesses on social media may not engage in that debate, it’s a prudent reminder that the web’s anonymity can cause a lot of malicious action in the name of free speech. Reputation management isn’t going to get easier as a result of Twitter’s changes; it will still require a human touch and an honest connection, because that’s what garners respect in the social media sphere. But hopefully this small corner of the web will be a little safer for everyone who uses it, giving people more courage to speak their minds without fear of retaliatory attempts to forcibly silence them.

SEO news blog post by @ 3:14 pm on August 6, 2013


 

Google+ Cover

Today we’ve got just a very quick blog post for you to let everyone know of a couple changes to Google+. Now you may be saying, “Google+? Why should I care?” I’ll leave that debate you your own mind save to say, if Google asks you to drink some Kool-Aid, just hope it’s a flavor you like. It’s become very clear over the past couple year that not only is Google not going to let Google+ go the way of Google Wave or the litany of other failed tests, they’re making moves to insure that it thrives or at the very least becomes the control mechanism for your other activities to a point where it doesn’t matter if you use Google+ … you’re information is being stored there regardless.

But today I’m not discussing the benefits of Google+ specifically, just covering a few key updates. So let’s get to that.

Changes To Google+

As of the morning Google has announces that they’re rolling out some changes to how your profile functions/appears.  They are:

  • The size of cover photos has increased to 2120px by 1192px.  To me this doesn’t make a ton of sense as it pushes the actual information down the page requiring more scrolling on all but the largest monitors but I can see applications of it for photographers and designers.  While I may not entirely believe this max resolution is ideal, I highly recommend toying with different images and this definitely provides a wide-range of options.
  • A tab for reviews.  They’ve added a tab when users can see all the reviews you’ve done.  You may want to scan through your reviews and make sure they match the image you want to send publicly.  One might argue you should be doing this all along but I know I looked as soon as the announcement came.
  • Editing your info get’s easier.  They’ve made the interface for editing your information a bit clearer and easy to use.

They did note that things are rolling out gradually so if you don’t see it yet, check back soon.  This writer doesn’t expect it to be a long rollout as it’s a Google+ change and they don’t want people to check, see they can’t play around, and forget to come back.

SEO news blog post by @ 7:56 am on March 6, 2013

Categories:Google,Google+

 

Google Chrome can point out ‘Noisy’ tabs..

Have you ever had a bunch of tabs open, decided to turn on your speakers/put on your headphones, only to find out that there’s something unexpected making sounds but you don’t know what?

[iframe width="550" height="413" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/IWCvwwD6cto?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen][/iframe]
Most annoying demonstration possible..

 
Viola! When you play HTML5 audio in a tab the browser animates the favicon to indicate this. (No, this doesn’t mean Chrome supports animated favicons yet, that’s still not working.)

Now I cheated and used a ‘canary build’ of Chrome to accomplish this, but really, other than working on cleaner animations/UI, this is a ‘must have’ option for all browsers!

I also took the time to show that it’s not ‘visualizing’ the audio in the tab (that would suck up too much CPU resources) but merely drawing on the favicon to indicate that the tab was recently attempting to play audio.

The new build of Chrome apparently also has an icon to indicate when a tab is recording, but I didn’t have any easy examples for demonstrating that option.

One of the things I stumbled on in the process of making this post was too note-worthy to not include in this post.

The ‘canary build’ of Chrome doesn’t use your default Chrome profile, and it can run side-by-side with your currently installed ‘stable’ version of Chrome with no cross-talk.

This meant that I was plopped into the YouTube TV/Movies when I went looking for a video to play, and I stumbled on this bargain:

Red Dawn in 480p for $20 CDN

Clearly YouTube needs to work out some pricing errors because I could get a blu-ray of Red Dawn for $20 brand new, and they go for $8 used online. Seeing that the HD version is $5 more really leaves me wondering how the error was made..

Patrick Swayze

Is it possible there’s a Patrick Swayze fan on the YouTube Movies team?

“Nobody put’s Red Dawn in the discount corner!”

UPDATE: Apparently someone DOES read this, and apparently I am not keeping up on movie releases. This is the 2012 ‘Red Dawn’, a REMAKE of the 1984 original, where the reds are North Koreans, and the plot involves an EMP attack that makes a ground invasion a ‘teeny tiny’ bit more plausible.

SEO news blog post by @ 12:27 pm on February 26, 2013


 

Feeling Old: Child of the 90s

Being a youthful person (aka: I never grew up) you could say I was a child of the 90s, but in all honesty, this new ‘Child of the 90s’ video promotion, from the marketing team behind Internet Explorer, just makes me feel old…

[iframe width="550" height="309" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/qkM6RJf15cg?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen][/iframe]
I’m pretty sure that generation YoYo came earlier & what’s up with that Apple II?

 
When I was young we had:
- 300baud vs. 56k
- 5.25″ vs. 3.5″
- monochrome vs. color
- Garfield™ vs. puppies
- Donkey Kong vs. Tamagotchi
- Handi-Snacks vs. Lunchables
- hockey cards vs. pogs

So it’s pretty close to my generation, but still makes me feel old.

Does it make me feel any affinity for IE, as if I can relate to it’s embarrassing past after remembering fanny packs?

Not really. It makes me remember when Netscape decided to put expiry dates on their browser so I was forced to install IE only for fear of support calls asking how to update Netscape.

Still, not a positive moment for IE, just being the browser that ’caused the least issues’, wasn’t much of a title?

How has that changed? Well now IE is, in my circles, the browser that that ’causes the most issues’.

So they grew up, but not the way we’d like, and until they expire all the old copies of IE laying around or break off to a new product name with zero ties to old IE issues, I thin IE is stuck with the ‘difficult child’ image.

When I was a kid..

When I was a kid we had electron guns we’d sit in front of, and the only thing between us and the gun firing electrons was a glass plate.

Child watching TVGun
People said it wasn’t good, told us to keep our distance..

 
Now with Samsung offering curved OLED screens they are urging us to get close, saying that the screens offer an immersive experience:

Child watching TV

 
OLED technology means less emissions, heat, and power consumption than almost any full color display technology available today.

As someone with less than 55″ inches of screen space curved around him right this moment, I’d have to say that this first screen will make it’s purchasers VERY happy once it comes to market and stops being a poster child for what’s coming.

Displays need to step-up indeed, what with all the 3d options coming out, including the very exciting Oculus Rift that’s been generating some interesting reaction videos (WARNING: Strong Language/Reactions):

[iframe width="550" height="309" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/KJo12Hz_BVI?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen][/iframe]
Candid Anthony didn’t seem very impressed until he tried it..

 
So while folks were saying the next step in displays will be to plug into our brains, it appears that we are finding another step closer without the brain jack. ;)

SEO news blog post by @ 1:30 pm on January 29, 2013


 

FaceBook Social Graph Search

It has been over ten years since people began making the choice to share their lives online, and users buying into social search will be the next step according to Facebook. Facebook has announced the release of their new search tool, called Graph Search; a reference to the network of friends its users have created.

This new search function encourages users to divulge more personal information in order to provide better advertising results.
Google began introducing semantic over the last few years, and there have been numerous attempts from other (Yelp, Trip Advisor, and Hunch) to utilize social search; but nothing at the order of magnitude at which Facebook operates.

Graph-Search-Zuckerberg

This new search function is being regarded by many as a test for the users of the social networking site which could have repercussions for the Internet at large due to the scale at which Facebook operates. The test will show whether users are willing to allow and contribute to more sharing of their personal lives and whether or not social search is the future of online interaction.

If successful, Facebook is confident that it’s over one billion users (1.01 billion as of September 2012) will be willing to share more information from the movies they watch, the places they visit or the food they eat.

Facebook’s algorithms will filter search results for each individual and ranking the friends and brands that it thinks a user would trust the most. Initially, the new tool will mine users photos, check-ins and likes, but will later search through a users complete profile, status updates, and posts.

Tom Stocky, one of the creators of Facebook search, said in an interview this week "People have shared all this great stuff on Facebook," Mr. Stocky said. "It’s latent value. We wanted a way to unlock that."

As anticipated Facebook users have mixed feelings regarding the new search tool. Independent studies suggest that social media users are actually becoming more resistant about revealing more about themselves online. This reluctance may stem from increased media attention given to online privacy and protection, and scattered reports of employers and educators using the medium to investigate Facebook profiles.

In a survey of 500 students aged 21 and 22, Eszter Hargittai, an associate professor of communication studies at Northwestern University stated: "These behavioral patterns seem to suggest that many young adults are less keen on sharing at least certain details about their lives rather than more."

Another study from the Pew Internet Center indicated that social users (especially those on Facebook) were aggressively pruning their profiles by removing friends, comments and tagged photos.

It may be that Facebook is taking a huge gamble with their launch into social search. With many users (including myself) trying to close down the doors of Facebook instead of opening them up, Facebook may not be paying enough attention to the fact that many users are facing a social-saturation-tipping point, or "social media burnout" en masse and may they have missed the mark on this latest endeavor.

SEO news blog post by @ 12:53 pm on January 21, 2013

Categories:Facebook

 

Facebook Social Search: Grasping for that Third Pillar?

On January 15th 2013, Facebook planted it’s so called “third pillar” of it’s social network empire, “social search”.

If Facebook *is* all about social media, and they already had a search function, how is this a big change?

Stack of coins with a magnifying glass on the pennies.
Okay, well that *is* some small change..

 
From what I can tell of the new search feature, it’s an exclusive index of Facebook, powered by Bing. So you get better/different results from the previous search options because it’s been handled by Microsoft’s search methodology.
 
So, you may be wondering, “Why isn’t Bing offering an improved ‘Social Search’ now that they have access to all this Facebook data?”, and you will be amused to note that today Bing indeed announced an improved ‘Social Search’ to users of their services.

In fact, Bing’s social search results are appended to the Facebook search results, and all clicks stay inside Facebook.

Still, what’s really ‘new’ about this search behavior?

Allegedly if I tack on action words to a search like, “visited by friends” or “popular with friends”, it’s supposed to marry the search results with social data from my friends list.

I gave that a whirl, trying to find various searches that would result in ‘approvals’ or ‘likes’ from my friends and I got very poor results.

Could it be that my tech savvy friends have dialed in their Facebook privacy settings to the point where Bing’s assistance is negligible? Possibly. And I wouldn’t blame them for it.

Then I tried some of the same searches in Google, without engaging any ‘social’ tags or features, and viola, I can see restaurants, pubs, and even retail stores that people in my circles have rated. I also know now to never have lunch with Dave, since he loves all the types of restaurants I try to avoid. :)

Plus, thanks to Google’s purchase of Zagat, I have a fallback option for accurate/honest feedback if my friends aren’t reviewing restaurants or pubs that I want to try out or are simply closer to my location.

While I’m not seeing a real improvement, FB is seeing a nice reversal of their stock prices, which were on a steady downfall last year, as we mentioned in our May 22nd, 2012, blog post: FB stock drops as SpaceX soars to success!

How long this will bolster their faltering stock value?

Will ‘Social Search’ mature into a feature that entices disinterested users to revisit Facebook?

Clearly that’s anyone’s guess, but at least they are trying to keep the ship afloat, and search traffic could help bolster ad revenue, as it did for Google.

Time will tell. ;)

SEO news blog post by @ 11:56 am on January 17, 2013


 

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