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Beanstalk's Internet Marketing Blog

At Beanstalk Search Engine Optimization we know that knowledge is power. That's the reason we started this Internet marketing blog back in 2005. We know that the better informed our visitors are, the better the decisions they will make for their websites and their online businesses. We hope you enjoy your stay and find the news, tips and ideas contained within this blog useful.


November 12, 2013

Fire at the Internet Archive’s San Francisco Scanning Center

Last Wednesday, November 6th 2013, at ~ 3:30 in the morning, a fire was detected in the scanning center at the Internet Archive’s San Francisco location.

Fire at the Internet Archive's San Francisco Location

You can read the full story here: Scanning Center Fire Please Help Rebuild While some folks are asking why they don’t have insurance, most are looking at this as a good reminder to make a long overdue contribution to the Internet Archives organization. Archive.org hosts a number of services:

- WebArchive (AKA: The Wayback Machine):

366 Billion web pages saved over time.

Almost everyone should know what this. It’s pretty much the only free to use webpage archive on the internet that snapshots all public-visible pages of major websites over time, saving new versions whenever they are detected. I’ve seen people resurrect major portions of hacked/deleted websites using this service, and as an SEO who often needs to know what sites ‘used’ to look like, this service is invaluable. – Video(or Moving Pictures):

This library contains digital movies uploaded by Archive users which range from classic full-length films, to daily alternative news broadcasts, to cartoons and concerts.

A great collection of free video in many handy formats. We’ve actually used the video clips in the past for posts where we wanted a little video to go along with an SEO post. There’s even some ‘banned cartoons‘ that had to be pulled for one reason or another. – Audio/Music

This library contains recordings ranging from alternative news programming, to Grateful Dead concerts, to Old Time Radio shows, to book and poetry readings, to original music uploaded by our users. Many of these audios and MP3s are available for free download.

This is a great spot for getting free sounds and other audio bits that you might need for a project. I can’t say we’ve used this for ‘SEO’ but the Community Audio section features over 1.3 million recordings that range from kids playing with microphones all the way to nice audio tracks that make good generic ‘hold music’. – Text/Books

Browse and read over 5 million books and items from over 1,500-curated collections. You will find a wide range of literature, historical texts and research materials; and wonderful thematic collections like Children’s Classics, Cookbooks and Genealogy.

While I haven’t spent much time in this portion of the archive, if someone wanted to create unique content from a fresh source, books/texts that have never previously been online might be a great place to start? I’d also wager this section is what was most impacted by the fire. From details included in the initial fire blog post it’s clear that works that were in the process of scanning were lost/damaged but otherwise the main loss is progress and equipment. – Live recordings:

A community committed to providing the highest quality live concerts in a lossless, downloadable format.

The Grateful Dead were early advocates of sharing live recordings and they had a ton of variety in live performances so they are well indexed on the archive. I was listening to their 1972 live performance in the Laeiszhalle. If only I knew more German and could understand some of the cheers from the audience. :)Software:

The collection includes a broad range of software related materials including shareware, freeware, video news releases about software titles, speed runs of actual software game play, previews and promos for software games, high-score and skill replays of various game genres, and the art of filmmaking with real-time computer game engines.

Ever wonder where old ROMs go to die? Well they never die, not with sites like Archive.org making backups of old FTP servers, CDROMs, and other outdated storage mediums. Need an old boot disk, driver, or just want to play some old arcade classics in an emulator? Take a peek!

Old Amiga 1000 with 1084 color screen.. I just threw one of those out last year. Great photo, pitty the advertising isn’t English. Is that ~$2,100 USD?

SEO news blog post by @ 5:30 pm


 

 

September 4, 2013

Facebook’s Contest Rules: NOW They Change Things!

This summer I put together a Facebook contest for a client. Up until last week, the social media’s site rules were explicitly clear: absolutely no promotion-related content could be administered within Facebook itself. If you wanted to make a promotion, you had to build it on a third-party app developer and host it as a tab on your page. Users could not enter by commenting on a post; likes could not count as votes. While my contest was a fantastic learning experience, the actual process—researching what Facebook would and wouldn’t expect, vetting third-party developers, trying to design and program the tab itself—was complicated and sometimes frustrating.

likeFacebook has now revamped its contest guidelines. The biggest change has been the removal of the third-party administration requirement; while it’s one alteration, it has massive ramifications for how businesses conduct themselves and interact with their fans. A comment, post, or like can now function as an entry or a vote; while third-party apps can still be used for larger campaigns, it can make the process of a quick giveaway or draw much simpler—as easy as just posting an update and asking for comments. This is obviously a big plus for page owners; fans are more likely to enter a giveaway where all they have to do is comment or like. It also becomes a great deal cheaper to host a promotion; while contests can be real business-builders, the app developers often charge a subscription fee for use of their service and may only offer a bare-bones free option, if any.

So the changes are a good thing for small businesses and pages looking to increase their traffic by doing giveaways and contests. Facebook still encourages the use of apps for larger and more personalized experiences; they also forbid pages from asking users to take part in promotions by liking or posting something to their own personal Timeline. And if I’d only done this client contest a few months later, I would have very possibly been able to pull it off quicker than I did (though I would have missed the opportunity to become truly acquainted with Photoshop).

That said, there are some legal ramifications for this change that will be interesting to follow as the new rules go into practice. For one, entry management may become a great deal more difficult; while the apps are very good at keeping track of exactly who enters the contest and what they must do, it could easily become a hassle to ensure each entry was legitimate when you’re just asking people to like a post. Furthermore, it can run up against official location rules; if the giveaway is tailored to the sweepstakes rules for The United States and the winner is in Britain, their legal claim to the prize—and the legality of their participation in the first place—may not be simple.

With apps, page owners must make clear exactly what counts as an entry and how the winners will be chosen. The US has very strict rules which dictate that all entries into a sweepstakes or draw must have an equal chance of winning. But if users can enter through a variety of actions, it can be difficult to track them; it also removes Facebook’s careful denial of liability, which had been so prominent in the earlier rules.

I’m interested to see how these rule changes will work out in the long run. While it’ll make things much easier for a lot of businesses, I can see many ways where things can go wrong, and the results remain to be seen. Until then, you can enter that draw for free wings without worry. Go forth and like to your heart’s content

SEO news blog post by @ 11:58 am


 

 

August 28, 2013

Link Reduction for Nerds

Let’s face it, even with our best efforts to make navigation clear and accessible, many websites are not as easy to navigate as they could be.

It doesn’t matter if you are first page super star, or a mom n pop blog with low traffic, most efforts really are no match for the diversity of our visitors.

When I first started blogging on SEO topics for Beanstalk I took a lot of effort to make my posts as accessible as I could with a bunch of different tricks like <acronym> tags (now they are <abbr> tags) and hyperlinks to any content that could be explored further.

Like a good SEO I added the rel="nofollow" to any external links, because that totally fixes all problems, right?

“No.. Not really.”

External links, when they actually are relevant to your topic, and point to a trusted resource, should not be marked as no-follow. Especially in the case of discussions or dynamic resources where you could be referencing a page that was recently updated with information on your topic. In that case you ‘need’ the crawlers to see that the remote page is relevant now.

Internal links are also a concern when they become redundant or excessive. If all your pages link to all your pages, you’re going to have a bad time.

If you went to a big new building downtown, and you asked the person at the visitors desk for directions and the fellow stopped at every few words to explain what he means by each word, you may never get to understanding the directions, at least not before you’re late for whatever destination you had.

Crawlers, even smart ones like Google Bot, don’t really appreciate 12 different URLs on one page that all go the same place. It’s a waste of resources to keep adding the same URL to the spiders as a bot crawls each of your pages.

In fact in some cases, if your pages have tons of repeated links to more pages with the same internal link structures, all the bots will see are the same few pages/URLs until they take the time push past the repeated links and get deeper into your site.

The boy who cried wolf.

The boy who cried wolf would probably be jumping up and down with another analogy, if the wolves hadn’t eaten him, just as your competition will gladly eat your position in the SERPs if your site is sending the crawlers to all the same pages.

Dave Davies has actually spoken about this many times, both on our blog, and on Search Engine Watch: Internal Linking to Promote Keyword Clusters.

“You really only NEED 1 link per page.”

Technically, you don’t actually need any links on your pages, you could just use Javascript that changes the window.location variable when desired and your pages would still work, but how would the robots get around without a sitemap? How would they understand which pages connect to which? Madness!

But don’t toss Javascript out the window just yet, there’s a middle ground where everyone can win!

If you use Javascript to send clicks to actual links on the page, you can markup more elements of your page without making a spaghetti mess of your navigation and without sending crawlers on repeated visits to duplicate URLs.

“In fact jQuery can do most of the work for you!”

Say I wanted to suggest you look at our Articles section, because we have so many articles, in the Articles section, but I didn’t want our articles page linked too many times?

Just tell jQuery to first find a matching <anchor>:
jQuery("a[href='/articles/']")

Then tell it to add an ID to that URL:
.attr( 'id', '/articles/');

And then tell it to send a click to that ID:
document.getElementById('/articles/').click();

Finally, make sure that your element style clearly matched the site’s style for real hyperlinks (ie: cursor: pointer; text-decoration: underline;)

UPDATE: For Chrome browsers you need to either refresh the page or you have to include the following in your page header: header("X-XSS-Protection: 0");

SEO news blog post by @ 6:07 pm


 

 

January 31, 2013

Are you Modern? Take the test!

modern.IE Logo

Two pro-Microsoft posts in one week? I know, Right?!

Clearly we are not masters of fate or IT news, so today’s headline is covering the new modern:IE Test Site setup to assist web developers with creating IE compatible site content.

Wasn’t it like, two days ago that I just pointed out that the big flaw with IE is that the old versions create a web design nightmare? *tap tap* .. Apparently this thing is turned on?

What does it test?

Actually the tool is a suite of tests with some specific test cases for IE browser specific issues.

Here’s a list of categories it will test and report on without setting up a ‘Site Owner’ account:

  • Fix common problems from supporting old versions of IE:
  • Known compatibility issues
  • Compatibility Mode
  • Frameworks & libraries
  • Web standards docmode
  • Help this webpage work well across browsers, across devices:
  • CSS prefixes
  • Browser plug-ins
  • Responsive web design
  • Browser detection
  • Consider building with some new features in Windows 8:
  • Touch browsing default
  • Start screen site tile

If you plug your URL in the page will test all these areas and report back to you where improvements could be made.

Additionally there is a direct link to the ‘Pinned Site Tile’ testing/design tool.

This tool lets you select an image (144×144 pixel PNG) and text for your website when a Windows 8 user wants to ‘Pin’ the site to their start menu.

My experience with the tool wasn’t great, likely due to some caching, but if you test your code against sites that do work properly you can still sort out the needed meta tags quickly enough.

Other Goodies?

Included in the suite is a link to the Internet Explorer Test Drive site to compare HTML5 features and performance with other browsers..

 
Technically, I ended up short on time to cover more, so if you dive in and start to wonder why we didn’t point out something new/interesting, feel free to let us know, we’re always open to feedback. :)

SEO news blog post by @ 12:20 pm


 

 

January 24, 2013

Free Ranking Reports on Google!

I keep seeing people ask for their rank, asking what the best free ranking tools are, etc., like it’s so darn hard to ask Google where your website is in terms of it’s keywords.

First of all, Google Analytics has an ‘Average Position’ column for popular search queries that tells you a lot of great info about your site’s keywords.

Google WMT Search Queries chart
This is an example of Search Queries sorted by Average Position

 
The link to this area is:
https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/top-search-queries?hl=en&siteUrl=
+ your URL.

Our website link would look like this:
…earch-queries?hl=en&siteUrl=http://www.beanstalk-inc.com/

You can also click at the top of the position column to sort it, or tack this onto the end of the URL:
&grid.sortBy=8&grid.currentOrder=2d

If you aren’t getting enough data from this, first try out the download options, and load them up in a spreadsheet so you can sort/filter the data.

Most folks are surprised what a little bit of filtering and grouping can accomplish to provide you with a fresh perspective on data.

Still not enough? Well there’s a zillion free tools that will gladly trade your URL and keyword targets for a limited ranking report.

This is valuable data, so why not trade something free for it? Google does!

Indeed there’s enough free tools, that I won’t even bother mentioning one. Why don’t we just make one?

It’s not ‘hard’ to get your rank really, lets break it down:

  • Make a list of phrases you are trying to rank for
  • Do a Google search for your first phrase
  • Keep searching until you find your site
  • Take note of the position
  • Repeat

So how does the average person do this? It’s gets pretty technical, but all the resources are out there, and free!

To break that down in simple terms:

  • Setup a server or install XAMPP
  • Setup a database/table to store your rankings by date
  • Make a page that CURLs for your keywords
  • Setup a schedule to execute the php page regularly

Bingo, you now have your own ranking reports tool, and nobody is the wiser, besides Google, and they are usually too busy to care that you’re extra curious about your rankings.

Nerd reading a book

Don’t get me wrong, there’s a lot of fine details to explain and not everyone is comfortable installing programs like this or scripting, but I am going to look at getting permission to make this a step-by-step how-to guide with full downloads so even novices can give this a try.

A final point to make is that excessive/automated queries on Google is a breach of their TOS, and could result in annoying blocks/complaints from Google if you were to attempt to use this method for a large set of keyword phrases, or wanted the reports updated constantly.

If you are a ‘power user’ who needs a lot of data, you’ll end up paying someone, and either you pay to use someone’s API key at a premium, or you get your own API key from Google and only pay for what you use.

Seems like an easy decision to me!

SEO news blog post by @ 1:03 pm


 

 

January 22, 2013

Oracle is meddling with search results?!

Like most headlines, there’s some leaping between facts going on, but we’ll connect the dots in short order, don’t you fret.

Scooby Doo Cartoon with additional logos
We want our Google results, not some Mystery Machine!?

 
Have you noticed how much/often Oracle has been updating Java on your machine lately?

You’d think, with all those security patches they are fixing, if you turned on a PC that has been dormant for 6 months it would be instantly hacked by it’s outdated Java upon loading nearly any web page?

Well that’s not exactly true, so what is true?

Here’s a list:

  • Oracle gets page traffic with each update
  • Ask.com pays for each install of the Ask Toolbar
  • By default the Ask.com toolbar is installed
  • Each update is a risk you won’t opt-out and click next
  • The Ask.com install waits 10 mins to install
  • Delayed invisible installs are a malware tactic
  • The Ask.com toolbar intercepts and modifies searches
  • Removing Ask’s toolbar won’t restore your search settings

Those are facts, and it doesn’t take a silver-tongued writer to get the reader to acknowledge how they all connect.

It’s so bad that IE, FireFox, and Chrome are all delivering UI changes to make these installs a LOT more clear to the end user..

.. and Ask.com has already started adding ‘helpers’ to make the new UI’s less likely to halt an installation where the user is just clicking along.

So it’s a back and forth struggle to keep your web browser free from unwanted clutter that pretends to be of value but actually alters your search results and steers you towards paid sites/links vs. organic search results.

How can you opt out of the war for your clicks?

If you don’t need Java, just don’t install it to begin with. If you hit something that needs Java then go ahead and use it; But don’t just install Java because you think it’s crucial.

You also don’t want to confuse JavaScript with Java; For some folks the Oracle Java installation can be completely avoided.

Use a clean installer without the added Ask.com payload. Since Oracle isn’t publishing any recent versions of the Java installer without the Ask.com toolbar components, this requires you to trust an outside 3rd party’s assistance, or use a risky/outdated version of Java.

Ninite icon
Ninite.com

What can I say about Ninite.com? In my nerdy travels online I’ve yet to discover an easier method of installing apps without the added payloads.

Not only that, but Ninite allows you to bundle up a ton of installs into one package with zero ‘next’ clicking as the packages install. Heck, you can even save the package URL for later, or share it with friends to help them install a specific set of apps!

Since Ninite grabs the source from the actual websites, you will get trusted/current code, without the bother of carefully installing each app and side-skirting all the additional packaged software/malware.

Plus as a one-stop reference to the most popular free installations, Ninite is also great for folks that want to stick with mainstream applications and avoid trying out some ‘less popular’ choices.

I hope this helps our readers avoid some hassles, get honest search results from the search engine you’ve selected, and perhaps even gives folks the motivation to try uninstalling Java completely to see just what the heck is using it anyways.

SEO news blog post by @ 1:31 pm


 

 

January 10, 2013

Missing Authorship Photos?

If you’ve become accustomed to seeing your charming mug in the SERPs when you are Google’ing your keywords, it might be rather unsettling to see those images suddenly disappear.

Rich Snippet SERP example

Fear not! This isn’t something you have done, or not done, this is actually kicking up a bit of fuss on the SEO forums/discussion areas today and clearly looks to be an issue on Google’s end.

In fact if you were in need of reassurance, all you have to do is hop into your Webmaster Tools account, and visit the ‘Rich Snippets Tool‘ to get a preview of what your SERPs would normally look like.

If you are sure that you’re not part of the current issue, or you’re just curious what we’re talking about, the Troubleshooting Rich Snippets page is a great resource to tackle possible problems.

Google invests another $200,000,000.00 in renewable energy..

I could have written .2 billion, or 200 million, or even 200 thousand thousands, but why play with such a large sum of money?

Google certainly isn’t playing around; With this latest investment Google’s grand total in renewable/clean energy is over $1 billion US and growing.

This isn’t just charity either, some of these investments are just smart business because the returns are very fixed and low risk.

Illustration of power saved by using GMail vs. Postal Mail

Being honest about pollution is brave, and bragging about your low footprint is begging for trouble, but Google marches on stating:

“100 searches on Google has about the same footprint as drying your hands with a standard electric dryer, ironing a shirt, or producing 1.5 tablespoons of orange juice.”

You can read more about Google’s efforts to reduce, eliminate, and assist others with power consumption/carbon footprints, over on the Google Green Pages.

SEO news blog post by @ 11:57 am


 

 

November 27, 2012

New YouTube Creator Space in LA

Google’s YouTube service has just launched it’s third Creator Space studio, this time in Playa Del Rey, Los Angeles.

Hughes H-4 Hercules Fuselage

The 41,000-square-foot aircraft hangar was formerly used by the US Army for making helicopters in the Vietnam years, and it was the assembly point for the famous Hughes H-4 Hercules transport plane in World War II.

Renovations to the facility have been extensive, with Google adding:
- professional-grade equipment
- green-screen stages
- motion-capture rooms
- screening room
- editing labs
..and more!

Have a look at the video from the UK version of YouTube’s Creator Space:

As you can see, this is a huge boon for aspiring entertainers, actors, producers, and even editors who want to learn the craft.

In fact it reminds me of the library in my Elementary school which had a full VHS recorder, camera, TV, and space to set up a stage. We would take the time to write scripts (bad jokes), dressup (do giant paper chipmunk teeth and thick rimmed glasses count as costumes?), and perform for camera.

While nobody ever watched what we recorded (this was during the advent of VHS), the recording was a popular affair and students would flock to the library when we were doing a show over lunch.

Likewise YouTube is hoping that they will encourage creators to mingle and ‘hang out’ in this space, granting them free reign to come and go as they please for the time period they are allotted.

Signing up for the UK space is done via this customized Google Docs sign up sheet.

There doesn’t appear to be any such sheet for the new California location, but the Creator Hub Website should handle all your inquiries.

The LA Times did a nice job of gathering some photos of the LA Creator Space into a gallery:

The new You Tube facilities in Playa Del Rey

Interestingly enough the same channel also has a really well polished video on YouTube Analytics that I’ve personally never seen previously:

 

Ernie Coombs / Mr.Dressup’s 85th Birthday

November 26th would have been Ernie Coombs’ 85th birthday, and Google Canada celebrated with a Google Doodle.

Mr.Dressup - A Canadian Childrens TV Show

It’s very amazing what one man, a puppet boy named Casey, a magical storage box full of costumes, and a puppet dog named Finnegan can do to engage an audience. When I was young I always wanted a tickle trunk, which really means I still want a tickle trunk because I’ve never grown up. ;)

Mr.Rogers on the other hand always seemed like a strange show, and I never really watched it, favoring our Canadian version, Mr.Dressup.

It’s interesting now to learn that Ernie Coombs, a US citizen, actually worked with Fred Rogers in Canada to debut ‘Misterogers’ which later on became the US children’s TV show, “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood”.

In fact many of the “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” set pieces, such as the Trolley, Eiffel Tower, the ‘tree’, and ‘castle’, were created by CBC designers during the initial 3 year run in Canada.

Mr.Dressup stayed in Canada, and became one of the longest running Canadian TV shows, running between 1967 and 1996 for a span of 29 years.

The actor may have passed on but our memories will linger for generations to come.

SEO news blog post by @ 11:31 am


 

 

November 22, 2012

Happy Thanksgiving!

There seems to be a lot of spam vs. turkey this year, but we still have plenty to be thankful for!

In fact just today I was reading about how Google is thanking Maps contributors with ‘Badges‘!

If you login to Google and head on over to the Map Maker section of Google Maps you can get started on either reviewing changes that need to be approved/disapproved, or make your own.

The badges are apparently awarded as follows (stolen from IBF):

List of Google MapMaker badges

So Thanks Google, for being Thankful! This is going to work very well for trust factors on your G+ profile, which as we pointed out many times now, should also be the author link for your site content.

In Other News..

DuckDuckGo was trying to prove they could deliver better search results without learning anything about the user.

It would have been neat if it were possible, but I wouldn’t send a stranger out to buy me new shoes, and I don’t want a web search that doesn’t know me either.

At this point DuckDuckGo have been reduced to complaining about Google not selling them cool domain names like “duck.com”, and how many extra clicks it takes to change the search engine in Chrome vs. Firefox.

While I agree that making use of duck.com as a 301 to google.com is a bit ‘cruel’, my guess is that nobody offered Google a fair price for the domain, and it’s not bad business to improve the value by holding onto the name until a valid offer comes along.

If DuckDuckGo wants to disclose how much they offered Google, I may change my opinion, but for now this is just ‘big business’ vs. anything ‘anti-competitive’, and if this is the absolute worst mud that DDG can sling at Google then they have little to complain about.

Google Music Translate

While I have been eager to see someone like Wierd Al tackle the song Gangnam Style with some English lyrics, I am not sure I’m eager to see this ‘project’ come to life:


Heck this was meant to be a joke, but Google is so spooky with it’s tech that this is totally plausible?

Indeed some news sites this morning are actually getting flamed for discussing this as if it were a real service offered by Google.

Well ‘played‘ sirs.. ;)

SEO news blog post by @ 12:53 pm


 

 

October 11, 2012

Windows 8 / IE10 and Flash Certification

Windows 8 is a tablet OS, and like any modern OS focused on tablets/touch/mobility options, there’s compatibility concerns with content not specifically written for a tablet/mobile device.

Apple’s famous for their certification process and using it for more than just the sake of ‘quality’ or ‘compatibility’ controls.

Indeed Microsoft has had certification for drivers, and applications in Windows for some time, but never to the point where something cannot be used without their certification.

If you wanted to install something that isn’t certified you’ll get a spooky warning, but I’ve never seen something completely fail to work due to a bad/missing certification on Windows.

Enter Windows 8 and IE10, a whole new ballgame, with two browser modes, one for normal use and a ‘desktop’ integration mode which has to play nice with the new Windows UI.

If you wish to publish web content that leverages the new ‘desktop mode’ you’ll want to visit Microsoft’s ‘developer guidance’ page for information on new meta tags and HTTP header codes that help flag such content.

In a nutshell they explain that either the header:

X-UA-Compatible: requiresActiveX=true

OR the meta tag:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="requiresActiveX=true" />

… work to create a handy little prompt explaining that the content on the page requires the page to be viewed in ‘desktop’ mode, and even gives a single-click shortcut to switch over:

IE10 desktop warning

The same page also deals with ‘Compatibility Verification’ and the steps to test/certify that your flash content is compatible with the extra features of a tablet OS.

Of particular interest is the option of a single registry entry that allows testing of your site for ‘debugging’ to see just how broken your flash content is.

The key is located here:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Flash\DebugDomain
.. and if you wanted to make a .reg file for easy access the contents would be:
REGEDIT4
**Blank Line/Carriage Return**
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Flash\DebugDomain] @="www.mywebsite.com"
**Blank Line/Carriage Return**

At that point you could right-click the .reg file you made and click on ‘install’ from within the pop-up menu.

Passing this .reg file to your developers would be fine, but since only one site can be specified, this is NOT a solution for your end users.

Obviously the best advice we can give, as SEOs, is to ditch your Flash content completely.

HTML5 with all it’s perks can replace almost anything you’ve done in Flash and Google’s even willing to help you make the switch by offering the Swiffy Flash -> HTML5 Conversion Tool.

If you feel your content is too sophisticated for Swiffy, or you haven’t tried the tool recently, you should!

Here’s an example of how well the tool works on a flash game with keyboard and mouse controls:

SEO news blog post by @ 12:07 pm


 

 

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