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Beanstalk's Internet Marketing Blog

At Beanstalk Search Engine Optimization we know that knowledge is power. That's the reason we started this Internet marketing blog back in 2005. We know that the better informed our visitors are, the better the decisions they will make for their websites and their online businesses. We hope you enjoy your stay and find the news, tips and ideas contained within this blog useful.


September 26, 2013

Much Ado About (not provided)

Our motto is (not provided).

Our motto is (not provided).

As many of our readers may already know, earlier this week Google changed the way their URL functions in such a way that for those who monitor their analytics (which should be all of you), you’ll now only see (not provided) where once you would have seen your keyword. This move was met with disappointment and more than a bit of annoyance on the part of SEOs and website owners. The reason (so they say) is to protect the privacy of their users. The logic is, if keyword data passes then it can be picked up in the log files of the site being visited along with data such as the IP address that would allow the user to be pinpointed with some degree of accuracy. So, to make sure that the owner of the custom t-shirt site I visited last week can’t figure out it was me that searched “custom t-shirts canada” that data is now kept from the receiving site. Now, here’s the annoyance – to say that it’s a case of protecting privacy would work UNTIL we realize that the same can’t be said for paid traffic. If you purchase traffic though AdWords, the data is tracked. Now of course it has to be or we’d all just be paying for AdWords and trusting that we were getting the traffic we paid for and that the bids made sense but the hypocrisy is pretty obvious – why is a user that clicks on an organic result then more deserving of privacy than those who click on a paid result? They’re not obviously, and we’re not being told the truth BUT that’s not really the discussion to be had is it? The fact of the matter is, it’s Google and they can do what they want with their own website. I believe I should get to do with my site what I want (within the confines of the law of course) and so I won’t take that away from others. So what is the real discussion …

What Do We Do Now?

While we’re all spending time arguing about the hypocrisy and crying foul, the fact of the matter is that it is what it is and now we have to figure out what to do.  We no longer have keyword data from Google.  There are two routes forward, the short term patch and the long term changes.

Short Term

In the short term we can use Advanced Segments to at least get a good idea about what keywords are producing what effect.  Essentially we can use them to filter traffic that follows patters similar to what specific keywords or keyword groups behaved like.  This tends to only work well with large traffic groupings so unless you get huge traffic for single phrases that behave uniquely – you’ll probably have to group your traffic together.  Branded vs non-branded for example.  I’m not going to get into how this is gone here in this blog post simply because I wrote a lengthy piece on it for Search Engine Watch back when (not provided) was first becoming an issue.  You can read about it at http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2143123/How-to-Understand-Your-Google-Not-Provided-Traffic.

This will only work for a while however.  You’ll see new traffic coming in and won’t know how it’s behavior impacts the results.  Essentially – this will give you a decent idea until your traffic sources change, your site changes, or time passes.  So what do we do …

Long Term

In the long run we have no option but to make massive adjustments to the way we look at our sites.  We can no longer determine which keywords perform the best and try to caft the user experience for them.  Instead we have to look at our search traffic in a big bucket.  Or do we?

While this may be true for some traffic, we can still segment but the landing page (which will give you a good idea of the phrases) as well as look at groups of pages (all in a  single directory for example).  I know for example that this change comes right when we ourselves are redesigning our website and in light of this I will be changing the way our directory structure and page naming system work to allow for better grouping of landing pages by common URL elements.  I imagine I won’t be the last to consider this factor when building or redeveloping a website.

What will need to change is our reliance on specific pieces of data.  I know I like to see that phrase A produced X result and work to improve that.  We’ll not have to look at larger groupings of data.  A downside to this (and Google will have to address this or we as SEOs will) is that it’s going to be a lot easier to mask bad practices as specific phrase data won’t be available.  I know for example that in an audit I was part of, we found bot traffic in part based on common phrase elements.  Today we wouldn’t be able to do this and the violations would continue.

We’re All Still Learning

Through the next couple months we’ll all be adjusting our reporting practices to facilitate this change.  I know that some innovative techniques will likely be developed to report as accurately as possible what traffic is doing what.  I know I’ll be staying on top if it and we’ll keep you posted here in our blog and on our Facebook page.

SEO news blog post by @ 10:48 am

Categories:Analytics,Google,Google

 

 

September 9, 2013

Liquid Galaxy: Science Fiction Becomes Fact

Google Earth is definitely one of the most fascinating playthings in the company’s toybox; it was impressive when it launched in 2001 (under the name ‘Keyhole Earthviewer’) and it remains impressive to this day. I remember logging on as a teenager at home and finding the Eiffel Tower in Paris; back then, the only option was a top-down view, and I was disappointed when I tried to change the angles so I could “stand” next to France’s most iconic building. But Google Earth has taken care of that problem; thanks to Street View being integrated into the program, you can zoom into practically anywhere on Earth and roam the streets, exploring cities you’ve never seen from the comfort of your desk.

That’s not all; Google Earth has added data to allow users to zoom in under the oceans, see the Lunar Lander on the surface of the Moon, and even view high-resolution images of Martian terrain scooped from the Mars Orbiter and Exploration Rovers. Google Earth users can even view historical images, traveling back in time to view what certain areas looked like many years ago. You can explore the Wieliczka Salt Mine in Poland and the Prado Museum in Madrid.

NGC_4414_(NASA-med)But one of Google Earth’s most incredible features is the one you probably won’t have heard of; it’s an open-source DIY-capable piece of code that takes one step closer to bringing science fiction tech to life. It’s called Liquid Galaxy, and its description—an ‘immersive Google Earth’—doesn’t do nearly enough justice to the possibilities it can create. You won’t find Liquid Galaxy as a major Google release; its official project page is full of technobabble and source code modifications from engineers all over the world. Part of the beauty of the product is that it can be whatever you want it to be. But when it comes down to it, Liquid Galaxy is a design concept that allows you to project Google Earth onto several screens at once, creating a unified surround view of the world. It was originally developed by some Google employees as an independent project; they wanted to recreate the experience of seeing their geo-product imagery in a more seamless way. Using a few extra Linux workstations, they built a big gazebo-style case that housed eight 55-inch LCD screens, and used a cluster of computers to project Google Earth seamlessly and simultaneously—a combination of the Holodeck and a huge flight simulator.

Liquid Galaxy presents an endless amount of potential for teaching everything from geography to climate change and urban planning; after taking Liquid Galaxy on the road and being met with overwhelming praise, in 2010 Google made their configuration, codes, and schematics public so that anyone could rig up their own version. This makes Liquid Galaxy a fasciatingly unique Google product; while it’s been available to the public for three years, very few people have had firsthand experience with one. Georgia State University has a 48-screen display wall using four Windows 7 machines; NASA has one at the Johnson Space Center. Some can be controlled using Xbox Kinect; others use head tracking software. Liquid Galaxy has been used to run the virtual reality game Second Life, allowing players to truly feel as if they’re stepping into Linden Labs’ simulated universe. One civilian user has even rigged a five-screen Liquid Galaxy to run a Quake 3 mod.

If you’re computer-savvy and itching for a new project, you can find the Liquid Galaxy project here. The site contains how-tos, a guide for where to buy pre-built componenets, and encourages users to post their new enhancements, any defects they find, and what they’ve built with the technology. Liquid Galaxy’s open source means that the possibilities really are endless; with a few high-quality computers and a creative imagination you could end up making your wildest science fiction dreams come true.

SEO news blog post by @ 9:35 am


 

 

March 6, 2013

Google+ Cover

Today we’ve got just a very quick blog post for you to let everyone know of a couple changes to Google+. Now you may be saying, “Google+? Why should I care?” I’ll leave that debate you your own mind save to say, if Google asks you to drink some Kool-Aid, just hope it’s a flavor you like. It’s become very clear over the past couple year that not only is Google not going to let Google+ go the way of Google Wave or the litany of other failed tests, they’re making moves to insure that it thrives or at the very least becomes the control mechanism for your other activities to a point where it doesn’t matter if you use Google+ … you’re information is being stored there regardless.

But today I’m not discussing the benefits of Google+ specifically, just covering a few key updates. So let’s get to that.

Changes To Google+

As of the morning Google has announces that they’re rolling out some changes to how your profile functions/appears.  They are:

  • The size of cover photos has increased to 2120px by 1192px.  To me this doesn’t make a ton of sense as it pushes the actual information down the page requiring more scrolling on all but the largest monitors but I can see applications of it for photographers and designers.  While I may not entirely believe this max resolution is ideal, I highly recommend toying with different images and this definitely provides a wide-range of options.
  • A tab for reviews.  They’ve added a tab when users can see all the reviews you’ve done.  You may want to scan through your reviews and make sure they match the image you want to send publicly.  One might argue you should be doing this all along but I know I looked as soon as the announcement came.
  • Editing your info get’s easier.  They’ve made the interface for editing your information a bit clearer and easy to use.

They did note that things are rolling out gradually so if you don’t see it yet, check back soon.  This writer doesn’t expect it to be a long rollout as it’s a Google+ change and they don’t want people to check, see they can’t play around, and forget to come back.

SEO news blog post by @ 7:56 am

Categories:Google,Google+

 

 

February 26, 2013

Google Chrome can point out ‘Noisy’ tabs..

Have you ever had a bunch of tabs open, decided to turn on your speakers/put on your headphones, only to find out that there’s something unexpected making sounds but you don’t know what?


Most annoying demonstration possible..

 
Viola! When you play HTML5 audio in a tab the browser animates the favicon to indicate this. (No, this doesn’t mean Chrome supports animated favicons yet, that’s still not working.)

Now I cheated and used a ‘canary build’ of Chrome to accomplish this, but really, other than working on cleaner animations/UI, this is a ‘must have’ option for all browsers!

I also took the time to show that it’s not ‘visualizing’ the audio in the tab (that would suck up too much CPU resources) but merely drawing on the favicon to indicate that the tab was recently attempting to play audio.

The new build of Chrome apparently also has an icon to indicate when a tab is recording, but I didn’t have any easy examples for demonstrating that option.

One of the things I stumbled on in the process of making this post was too note-worthy to not include in this post.

The ‘canary build’ of Chrome doesn’t use your default Chrome profile, and it can run side-by-side with your currently installed ‘stable’ version of Chrome with no cross-talk.

This meant that I was plopped into the YouTube TV/Movies when I went looking for a video to play, and I stumbled on this bargain:

Red Dawn in 480p for $20 CDN

Clearly YouTube needs to work out some pricing errors because I could get a blu-ray of Red Dawn for $20 brand new, and they go for $8 used online. Seeing that the HD version is $5 more really leaves me wondering how the error was made..

Patrick Swayze

Is it possible there’s a Patrick Swayze fan on the YouTube Movies team?

“Nobody put’s Red Dawn in the discount corner!”

UPDATE: Apparently someone DOES read this, and apparently I am not keeping up on movie releases. This is the 2012 ‘Red Dawn’, a REMAKE of the 1984 original, where the reds are North Koreans, and the plot involves an EMP attack that makes a ground invasion a ‘teeny tiny’ bit more plausible.

SEO news blog post by @ 12:27 pm


 

 

February 7, 2013

That escalated quickly: Google Glass prices, dates, and a spec leak?

I’ve talked about Google Glass already, Finnish them! (Google Glasses and WiFi Liabillity), Google Chronos?, Google develops ARGs for Pirates, many times..

In those articles we were mostly looking at patents and prototypes.

Now we have WIRED.COM and arstechnica.com both spewing out specs based on more patents and some developer info…

A bone conduction listening device.
Hello? Can you ear me?
  • 802.11 b/g 2.4 GHz WLAN
  • Bluetooth ver 4.0 low-energy radio
  • “Bone Conduction” audio playback
  • a $1,500 (£962) price tag
  • developer shipments in early 2013
  • a projected 2014 launch date

Breaking this down, we learn a fair bit from each fact we can establish.

802.11 b/g support means that N mode WiFi won’t likely be supported, and the best guess would be the it’s getting dropped due to power consumption. Additionally, there’s a rumor that the primary data connection for the Google Glass will be a tethered cell phone acting as a ‘modem’ of sorts to expand the Google Glass’s communications range without bulking it up.

The 4.0 version of the Bluetooth radio stack is an exceptionally good match for a device running off of batteries, that sits on your head. This version of the Bluetooth stack supports BLE – Bluetooth Low Energy mode operations that allow a device like Google glass to sip on power and still remain connected to other devices.

If Google Glass had an option to support class 1 (100mW transmissions) networks it would supply you with a range of up to 328′ or 100 meters. If you were a household cleaner you could leave your phone in a central location, put on your Google glasses, and record your cleaning efforts directly to your phone or relay it to a remote server. By doing this you could safe guard yourself against damage claims and other issues presented by the homeowners.

In fact you could also be listening to some music, without blocking your ability to hear other sounds, like a knock at the door, or someone coming home. This is because the Google glass does not block incoming sounds/cover your ears.

The ‘bone conduction‘ audio drivers on the Google Glass send audio vibrations via your skull bones to your inner ear which then ‘hears’ the vibrations as sound.

This means that if you are driving, biking, walking, etc., you can expect the Google Glass audio feedback to be less of an obstruction/safety risk than typical in-ear or over-ear style systems.

Picture wearing these as a lawyer, and someone is attempting to hold you to words you’ve never even said. You could jump to the date/time the original discussion occurred and play it back verbatim, clearing up any mistakes/poor recollection that might otherwise cause endless headaches.

The trick in this case, since a lawyer/doctor, couldn’t ethically record video to an insecure/public location like a ‘Google Hangout’, would be for Google to either offer some sort of private video storage/search/retrieval service (I hear they have some experience with video?), that has the sufficient security clearances to avoid any concerns about storage.

The $1,500.00 price tag is for the Developer’s build of the device, currently being called the ‘Explorer Edition’, that will be shipping this year. In fact Google has said “early this year” as the date, so “sooner than later” is a fine guesstimate.

The signup for the Explorer Edition was actually quite the event, while the attendees were sitting in the conference center Google dropped some ‘Glass’ equipped sky-divers onto the site from an overhead balloon. The video from their Glass units was then streamed inside the event for a bit of a surreal effect.

At the end of the conference the developers willing to pay the $1,500.00 price tag were given a specially etched slate of glass with the serial # of the unit they will be shipping to you later.

A glass brick with a serial number etched into it.
Ooooh my precious.. So shiny..

SEO news blog post by @ 10:44 am


 

 

January 22, 2013

Oracle is meddling with search results?!

Like most headlines, there’s some leaping between facts going on, but we’ll connect the dots in short order, don’t you fret.

Scooby Doo Cartoon with additional logos
We want our Google results, not some Mystery Machine!?

 
Have you noticed how much/often Oracle has been updating Java on your machine lately?

You’d think, with all those security patches they are fixing, if you turned on a PC that has been dormant for 6 months it would be instantly hacked by it’s outdated Java upon loading nearly any web page?

Well that’s not exactly true, so what is true?

Here’s a list:

  • Oracle gets page traffic with each update
  • Ask.com pays for each install of the Ask Toolbar
  • By default the Ask.com toolbar is installed
  • Each update is a risk you won’t opt-out and click next
  • The Ask.com install waits 10 mins to install
  • Delayed invisible installs are a malware tactic
  • The Ask.com toolbar intercepts and modifies searches
  • Removing Ask’s toolbar won’t restore your search settings

Those are facts, and it doesn’t take a silver-tongued writer to get the reader to acknowledge how they all connect.

It’s so bad that IE, FireFox, and Chrome are all delivering UI changes to make these installs a LOT more clear to the end user..

.. and Ask.com has already started adding ‘helpers’ to make the new UI’s less likely to halt an installation where the user is just clicking along.

So it’s a back and forth struggle to keep your web browser free from unwanted clutter that pretends to be of value but actually alters your search results and steers you towards paid sites/links vs. organic search results.

How can you opt out of the war for your clicks?

If you don’t need Java, just don’t install it to begin with. If you hit something that needs Java then go ahead and use it; But don’t just install Java because you think it’s crucial.

You also don’t want to confuse JavaScript with Java; For some folks the Oracle Java installation can be completely avoided.

Use a clean installer without the added Ask.com payload. Since Oracle isn’t publishing any recent versions of the Java installer without the Ask.com toolbar components, this requires you to trust an outside 3rd party’s assistance, or use a risky/outdated version of Java.

Ninite icon
Ninite.com

What can I say about Ninite.com? In my nerdy travels online I’ve yet to discover an easier method of installing apps without the added payloads.

Not only that, but Ninite allows you to bundle up a ton of installs into one package with zero ‘next’ clicking as the packages install. Heck, you can even save the package URL for later, or share it with friends to help them install a specific set of apps!

Since Ninite grabs the source from the actual websites, you will get trusted/current code, without the bother of carefully installing each app and side-skirting all the additional packaged software/malware.

Plus as a one-stop reference to the most popular free installations, Ninite is also great for folks that want to stick with mainstream applications and avoid trying out some ‘less popular’ choices.

I hope this helps our readers avoid some hassles, get honest search results from the search engine you’ve selected, and perhaps even gives folks the motivation to try uninstalling Java completely to see just what the heck is using it anyways.

SEO news blog post by @ 1:31 pm


 

 

January 17, 2013

Facebook Social Search: Grasping for that Third Pillar?

On January 15th 2013, Facebook planted it’s so called “third pillar” of it’s social network empire, “social search”.

If Facebook *is* all about social media, and they already had a search function, how is this a big change?

Stack of coins with a magnifying glass on the pennies.
Okay, well that *is* some small change..

 
From what I can tell of the new search feature, it’s an exclusive index of Facebook, powered by Bing. So you get better/different results from the previous search options because it’s been handled by Microsoft’s search methodology.
 
So, you may be wondering, “Why isn’t Bing offering an improved ‘Social Search’ now that they have access to all this Facebook data?”, and you will be amused to note that today Bing indeed announced an improved ‘Social Search’ to users of their services.

In fact, Bing’s social search results are appended to the Facebook search results, and all clicks stay inside Facebook.

Still, what’s really ‘new’ about this search behavior?

Allegedly if I tack on action words to a search like, “visited by friends” or “popular with friends”, it’s supposed to marry the search results with social data from my friends list.

I gave that a whirl, trying to find various searches that would result in ‘approvals’ or ‘likes’ from my friends and I got very poor results.

Could it be that my tech savvy friends have dialed in their Facebook privacy settings to the point where Bing’s assistance is negligible? Possibly. And I wouldn’t blame them for it.

Then I tried some of the same searches in Google, without engaging any ‘social’ tags or features, and viola, I can see restaurants, pubs, and even retail stores that people in my circles have rated. I also know now to never have lunch with Dave, since he loves all the types of restaurants I try to avoid. :)

Plus, thanks to Google’s purchase of Zagat, I have a fallback option for accurate/honest feedback if my friends aren’t reviewing restaurants or pubs that I want to try out or are simply closer to my location.

While I’m not seeing a real improvement, FB is seeing a nice reversal of their stock prices, which were on a steady downfall last year, as we mentioned in our May 22nd, 2012, blog post: FB stock drops as SpaceX soars to success!

How long this will bolster their faltering stock value?

Will ‘Social Search’ mature into a feature that entices disinterested users to revisit Facebook?

Clearly that’s anyone’s guess, but at least they are trying to keep the ship afloat, and search traffic could help bolster ad revenue, as it did for Google.

Time will tell. ;)

SEO news blog post by @ 11:56 am


 

 

January 10, 2013

Missing Authorship Photos?

If you’ve become accustomed to seeing your charming mug in the SERPs when you are Google’ing your keywords, it might be rather unsettling to see those images suddenly disappear.

Rich Snippet SERP example

Fear not! This isn’t something you have done, or not done, this is actually kicking up a bit of fuss on the SEO forums/discussion areas today and clearly looks to be an issue on Google’s end.

In fact if you were in need of reassurance, all you have to do is hop into your Webmaster Tools account, and visit the ‘Rich Snippets Tool‘ to get a preview of what your SERPs would normally look like.

If you are sure that you’re not part of the current issue, or you’re just curious what we’re talking about, the Troubleshooting Rich Snippets page is a great resource to tackle possible problems.

Google invests another $200,000,000.00 in renewable energy..

I could have written .2 billion, or 200 million, or even 200 thousand thousands, but why play with such a large sum of money?

Google certainly isn’t playing around; With this latest investment Google’s grand total in renewable/clean energy is over $1 billion US and growing.

This isn’t just charity either, some of these investments are just smart business because the returns are very fixed and low risk.

Illustration of power saved by using GMail vs. Postal Mail

Being honest about pollution is brave, and bragging about your low footprint is begging for trouble, but Google marches on stating:

“100 searches on Google has about the same footprint as drying your hands with a standard electric dryer, ironing a shirt, or producing 1.5 tablespoons of orange juice.”

You can read more about Google’s efforts to reduce, eliminate, and assist others with power consumption/carbon footprints, over on the Google Green Pages.

SEO news blog post by @ 11:57 am


 

 

January 9, 2013

Google Ad Words for YouTube Videos

Google has released a new service to promote your YouTube videos online, called AdWords for Video. Google has taken many of the familiar components from their popular AdWords service and successfully applied them to video in a new video campaign management tool that allows for quick video ad creation and better video ad reporting.

Google announce back in November of 2011 that they discontinue the original ads.youtube.com service. The new service is located at http://adwords.google.com/video. Existing users of Google AdWords can sign in with their current account credentials or sign up for a new AdWords account.

"If you have an ad or a video, YouTube is the only place where you can surround your brand with relevant content and YouTube makes sure that it is appropriate for your audience. With the millions of views that YouTube gets every day, they are certain to find a perfect fit for your message."

AdWords for Video screen shot

This new AdWords service allows users to easily promote their videos on YouTube and the Google Display Network. The GDN includes videos and content from thousands of websites and claims to allow you to access to 80% of the "online video content space."

Google AdWords for video allows you to:

  • Reach the right viewer at the right price
  • Pay only when the ads is viewed
  • Allows you to easily manage video ad campaigns

Users will get valuable information such as the number of views, video reporting, easy to setup targeting for your preferred audience(s).

For more information, see Google Support.

SEO news blog post by @ 11:09 am

Categories:Google,YouTube

 

 

January 8, 2013

Google gives back free WiFi

Google’s New York offices are located in the lower Manhattan neighborhood of Chelsea, and today Google announced free WiFi would be provided to the area.

Expected WiFi coverage area for Free Chelsea WiFi
Expected WiFi coverage area for free Google WiFi in the Chelsea neighborhood.

 
The image above attempts to map the coverage area described as:

“Gansevoort Street and 19th Street, from 8th Avenue to the West Side Highway including the Chelsea Triangle, 14th Street Park, and Gansevoort Plaza”

After 6 years of working in the neighborhood Google was proud to offer free WiFi to the area which has a very high density of students (5,000+) and full time residents.

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer, and Google’s CIO, Ben Fried, got together to make the announcement in public at 10:30 AM EST.

Given the technical nature of the area’s residents, the free Wifi offering should help pull in more tech companies with similar goals.

I know that if Google wanted to give me free internet, I’d gladly take that $60/month savings, and they are offering this to nearly 10,000 residents/businesses?!

You go Google!

Charged up about Bluetooth Batteries

Tethercell

Have you ever wanted to:
- know the charge level of installed batteries
- remotely turn on/off something battery powered
- get a warning when your fire alarm battery is low

Well now you can take control of anything that uses AA batteries, using an iPhone, and later on this will obviously be available to your tablet, laptop, PC, or really anything with Bluetooth.

The Thethercell is a new product from two rocket scientists who actually worked on the SpaceX project.

It’s essentially a AAA battery holder with a AA battery’s dimensions. The holder also has a low-power Bluetooth radio/controller chipset, which allows the battery to be checked, and turned off and on remotely.

Here’s a couple examples I’ve seen that give some idea of uses :

- install in a Click-Light
- put the Click-Light in the garage
- set the Tethercell to ‘auto-on’
- tether to your cell phone
- now you have automatic lighting

Tethercell with battery installed.

- install in a baby monitor
- set low battery alarm
- set timer for on/off periods
- spy on people during certain hours
- batteries will last much longer

- install in an old music player
- tether to a device with motion sensor
- play white noise on the music player
- when motion stops the player switches off
- attach the device to your bed/pillow
- white noise will play until you fall asleep

Since this is a fresh product, still in the ‘prototype’ phase, I’d expect lots more ideas on uses to pop up in the future.

In fact I could see companies which use a lot of batteries looking at this as the ultimate in cost cutting/waste management options. The entry point is minimal, and the product itself is likely to be less than $10/each once the economy of scale has taken effect.

SEO news blog post by @ 11:48 am


 

 

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