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Beanstalk's Internet Marketing Blog

At Beanstalk Search Engine Optimization we know that knowledge is power. That's the reason we started this Internet marketing blog back in 2005. We know that the better informed our visitors are, the better the decisions they will make for their websites and their online businesses. We hope you enjoy your stay and find the news, tips and ideas contained within this blog useful.


April 9, 2014

Is the heart of your website beating or bleeding?


The Heartbleed Bug is a serious SSL/TLS encryption vulnerability in the popular OpenSSL cryptographic software library. So what is it?


Seems like we’ve heard this all before?



To put it into layman’s terms, Heartbleed or CVE-2014-0160, depending on your pedantic nature, is a really bad thing.

In less simple terms, the ‘heartbeat’ service of OpenSSL can be exploited to ‘leak’ it’s memory and reveal the contents of of otherwise protected/encrypted data.

But we’ve heard of OpenSSL exploits/vulnerabilities before, why is this one exciting?

Heartbleed vulnerability logo

Not only does Heartbleed have it’s own logo:

..it has it’s own website: http://heartbleed.com/


If you wanted to know all about it, the heartbleed.com website is full of information and details on the vulnerability if you want to dig right in for maximum info.


Essentially these are the points made:

  • This vulnerability has been around for years and so if someone had captured traffic from a year ago, and then got your secret keys with this exploit, this could allow them access to data you thought nobody could touch.

  • Using this exploit to impersonate your servers could allow an attacker even more access.

  • This is untraceable at the moment, meaning you don’t know what secure/protected content was stolen, or when.

  • This isn’t even all about you and your servers, think about the private data of your users and how a common password could be stolen from your server and used to infiltrate other more-secure servers around the internet.



Who is impacted :

  • Everyone that uses SSL is impacted in some way. Even if you just have to change some passwords. This will impact you.

  • OpenSSL 1.0.1 through 1.0.1f are vulnerable. OpenSSL 1.0.1g and newer are fine. Very old servers that didn’t upgrade to the heartbeat feature may be immune.

  • It’s estimated that this applies to over 66% of the web servers on the internet.

What to do :

  • Upgrade OpenSSL and/or disable the heartbeat function.

  • If you don’t disable the heartbeat function you can expect to be contacted by security teams checking to make sure you’ve upgraded.

  • Make sure your users know, either by a site bulletin, or perhaps a blog post?

  • Urge users to make password changes once you’ve secured your server.

  • Make it clear that users need to update that password on all sites that it was used on.

  • Be honest. No data can be assumed private at this point, your users should consider this truth.

  • Revoke and reissue your server’s primary keys.

  • As servers get patched you can reconnect with them, but there should be a ‘patch first, trust after’ policy.


..and above all else, Don’t Panic. :)

Update: If you are hosted on CentOS don’t assume you are vulnerable based on the version. In our case we had version 1.0.1e installed but it has been patched for CVE-2014-0160, which I can confirm with SSH access and looking at the RPM changelog.
 

SEO news blog post by @ 3:27 pm


 

 

March 19, 2014

Is your business wearable aware?

Has your SEO been mentioning Mobile/Tablet apps and designs a lot?

SEO Concerns for Mobile Websites – August 16th, 2013

Google Q3, Mobile Ads & Hummingbird – October 21, 2013

I For One, Welcome Our Google-Android Overlords! – May 3, 2011

Who needs a mobile website? – June 23, 2009

It seems like YEARS of nagging, so why haven’t you made the moves? Are you waiting for the mobile fad to die?

In 2012 Google dropped the bomb that Android installations had hit the 400 million mark with a pretty snazzy video:

Then in 2013 Google did another high-def video announcing they more than doubled the install base in just one year to 900 million installs:

While I haven’t seen a video for 2014 yet, I can only imagine that we are in the billions of installs now and here I am still trying to get business owners to see that even if this was a fad, it’s worth being part of, in a big way.

Need more ammo to dig into the mobile ‘fad’? How about Google going public with the Wear SDK for Android?

On Tuesday, March 18, 2014, the Offical Google Blog published:

Today we’re announcing Android Wear, a project that extends Android to wearables. And we’re starting with the most familiar wearable—watches.

Google is not only ‘gearing up’ with the recently acquired Motorola Mobility division, but it’s also working with hardware partners like Samsung, LG, HTC, Asus, and major brands in the chipset manufacturing/fashion industry to make sure that top tier products will soon be available from multiple brands, with high tech and high fashion rolled into a desirable wearable.

The ‘Information that moves with you’ video, aimed at consumers, is a bit ‘goofy’ and the shrug at the end sums up how I feel about these demonstrations of fledgeling hardware innovations.

However the developer preview video is where I would like business owners to focus their attention:

This video is FAR more interesting in that what we want to do is get behind this tech before our competition, supporting not just early adopters, but also getting the recognition that comes from being first to market with a solution.

As an SEO, Beanstalk has to constantly monitor and appraise site health and rankings for a number of our client websites. Right now we’re just testing our automation and only publish monthly reports focused on key areas of interest, but that’s going to change as we push our abilities.

Worried about negative SEO tactics? Very soon we should be able to offer a unique level of protection for our clients with respect to instant alerts for a spike/drop in backlinks/no-follow flags on backlinks. If you suddenly lost 100s of backlinks overnight and there was a spike of backlinks becoming no-follow, wouldn’t you want that info immediately?

Want to watch for syndication of an article or keyphrase with some special criteria? We would be able to get that outreach info to you instantly on the Wearable SDK thanks to the scripts and tools we’ve purchased and developed for maintaining our client’s web rankings.

Obviously our client’s core SEO needs always come first and we’re in the midst of a server hardware rollout so I can’t say “check back next week” but I can say to expect more from us soon!

SEO news blog post by @ 2:08 pm


 

 

August 16, 2013

SEO concerns for Mobile Websites

You want to serve your clients needs regardless of what device they visit your site with, but how do you do it easily without upsetting your SEO?

Lets look at the various options for tackling Mobile sites and what each means in terms of SEO:

Responsive Design :
 
Visual demonstration of responsive web design

  • Responsive design is growing in popularity, especially as communications technology evolves, and bandwidth/memory use is less of a concern.
  • This method also gives us a single URL to work with which helps to keep the sitemap/structure as simple as possible without redirection nightmares.
  • On top of that, Googlebot won’t need to visit multiple URLs to index your content updates.
  • Less to crawl means Googlebot will have a better chance to index more of your pages/get deeper inside your site.
“Why is/was there a concern about mobile page size?”

Low-end mobiles, like a Nokia C6 from 4+ years ago (which was still an offering from major telcos last year), typically require that total page data be less than 1mb in order for the phone to handle the memory needs of rendering/displaying the site.

If you go over that memory limit/tipping point you risk causing the browser to crash with an error that the device memory has been exceeded. Re-loading the browser drops you on the device’s default home-page with all your history lost. I think we could all agree that this is not a good remote experience for potential clients.

Higher-end devices are still victims of their real-world connectivity. Most 3rd generation devices can hit really nice peak speeds, but rarely get into a physical location where those speeds are consistent for a reasonable length of time.

Therefore, even with the latest gee-wiz handsets, your ratio of successfully delivering your entire page to mobile users will be impacted by the amount of data you require them to fetch.

In a responsive web design scenario the main HTML content is typically sent along with CSS markup that caters to the layout/screen limitations of a mobile web browser. While this can mean omission of image data and other resources, many sites simply attempt to ‘resize’ and ‘rearrange’ the content leading to very similar bandwidth/memory needs for mobile sites using responsive design approaches.

The SEO concern with responsive designs is that since the written HTML content is included in the mobile styling it’s very crucial that external search engines/crawlers understand that the mobile styled content is not cloaking or other black-hat techniques. Google does a great job of detecting this and we discuss how a bit later on with some links to Google’s own pages on the topic.

Mobile Pages :

Visual demonstration of mobile web page design

 
If you’ve ever visited ‘mobile.site.com’ or something like that, you’ve already seen what mobile versions of a site can look like. Typically these versions skip reformatting the main site content and they get right down to the business of catering to the unique needs of mobile visitors.

Not only can it be a LOT easier to build a mobile version of your site/pages, you can expect these versions to have more features and be more compatible with a wider range of devices.

Tools like jQuery Mobile will have you making pages in a jiffy and uses modern techniques/HTML5. It’s so easy you could even make a demo image purely for the sake of a blog post! ;)

This also frees up your main site design so you can make changes without worrying what impact it has on mobile.

“What about my content?”

Excellent question!

Mobile versions of sites with lots of useful content (AKA: great websites) can feel like a major hurdle to tackle, but in most cases there’s some awesome solutions to making your content work with mobile versions.

The last thing you’d want to do is block content from mobile visitors, and Google’s ranking algorithm updates in June/2013 agree.

Even something as simple as a faulty redirect where your mobile site is serving up:
mobile.site.com/
..when the visitor requested:
www.site.com/articles/how_to_rank.html

.. is a really bad situation, and in Google’s own words:

“If the content doesn’t exist in a smartphone-friendly format, showing the desktop content is better than redirecting to an irrelevant page.”

 
You might think the solution to ‘light content’ or ‘duplicate content’ in mobile versions is to block crawlers from indexing the mobile versions of a page, but you’d be a bit off the mark because you actually want to make sure crawlers know you have mobile versions to evaluate and rank.

In fact if you hop on over to Google Analytics, you will see that Google is tracking how well your site is doing for mobile, desktop, and tablet visitors:
Example of Google Analytics for a site with mobile SEO issues.

(Nearly double the bounce rate for Mobile? Low page counts/duration as well!?)

 
Google Analytics will show you even more details, so if you want to know how well you do on Android vs. BlackBerry, they can tell you.

“How do the crawlers/search engines sort it out?”

A canonical URL is always a good idea, but using a canonical between a mobile page and the desktop version just makes sense.

A canonical can cancel out any fears of showing duplicate content and help the crawlers understand the relationship between your URLs with just one line of markup.

On the flip-side a rel=”alternate” link in the desktop version of the page will help ensure the connection between them is understood completely.

The following is straight from the Google Developers help docs:

On the desktop page, add:

<link rel="alternate" media="only screen and (max-width: 640px)" href="http://m.example.com/page-1" >

and on the mobile page, the required annotation should be:

<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.example.com/page-1" >

This rel=”canonical” tag on the mobile URL pointing to the desktop page is required.

Even with responsive design, Googlebot is pretty smart, and if you aren’t blocking access to resources intended for a mobile browser, Google can/should detect responsive design from the content itself.

Google’s own help pages confirm this and provide the following example of responsive CSS markup:

    @media only screen and (max-width: 640px) {...}

In this example they are showing us a CSS rule that applies when the screen max-width is 640px; A clear sign that the rules would apply to a mobile device vs. desktop.

Google Webmaster Central takes the information even further, providing tips and examples for implementing responsive design.

Ever wondered how to control what happens when a mobile device rotates and the screen width changes? Click the link above. :)

SEO news blog post by @ 3:51 pm


 

 

February 21, 2013

Pixel free with Google’s Chromebook Pixel

Google’s Chromebook was supposed to be more of a ‘big Android’, a tablet with a keyboard and an OS centered around the Chrome browser, subsidized to be cheaper than a full laptop and almost ‘disposable’ due to the low cost and lack of local storage/personalization.

 
This new laptop is nearly the opposite of the first Chromebooks:
- Expensive! At ~$1,449* you won’t want to be ‘disposing’ this?
- Powerful! An Intel i5 CPU
- 32GB local storage! Heaps of space for something that saves to the cloud?
- 2560 x 1700 3:2 12.85″ touch screen! For web browsing?
- 4GB RAM! How many tabs are you going to have open?
- Intel HD 4000 GPU! This is actually going to be handy for WebGL.
- 5hrs est. battery life! More than you should need between charges?
*(For the LTE Pixel. $1,299 for the WiFi Pixel)

So why is the highest resolution screen to ever be sold in a retail laptop getting married to a WebOS?

Well according to Google, the insane resolution is a nod to the future of the web and what’s in store.

So clearly the only thing that’s disposable about the Chromebook Pixel is the ‘disposable’ nature of the previous Chromebooks?

Speaking of what’s clear, this new Chromebook has a lot of not so obvious features:
- Back-lighting under the keyboard for low-light use
- Quality speakers that also lurk under the keyboard
- Stereo microphones and a 720p webcam in the lid
- A 3rd ‘keyboard’ microphone to eliminate typing noise in recordings
- Cooling vents in the screen hinge to avoid blockage
- A hinge design that does not lift the bottom of the laptop when opening
- Over-sized track-pad with special surface treatment
- A funky blue-red-yellow-green LED status bar/power light

In fact the fellows who have been hands-on with the Pixel admit that the whole affair comes off like a “high-end luxury automobile” with all the subtle attention to detail.

Not once have I seen any mention of who’s manufacturing the new Chromebook, but my guess would be that it’s a Lenovo device at the core.

The biggest concern seems to be the price, which is understandable, especially considering the ultra-low prices of competing tablets that seem much better engineered for the tasks that you’d use a Chromebook for.

Keep in mind that this is a Linux OS that runs a Chrome browser tuned for HTML5. Using the machine for much of anything outside of the browser or play store is going to require the skills of a nerdy power user to implement.

Here’s the original into video from 2009 when the Chrome OS was just launching (I love that ‘cloud’ wasn’t a buzz-word back then):

 
So while the new Google Chromebook Pixel can be used for lots of things this really seems like massive overkill for what you can tackle with Chrome OS right now.

SEO news blog post by @ 5:03 pm


 

 

January 31, 2013

Are you Modern? Take the test!

modern.IE Logo

Two pro-Microsoft posts in one week? I know, Right?!

Clearly we are not masters of fate or IT news, so today’s headline is covering the new modern:IE Test Site setup to assist web developers with creating IE compatible site content.

Wasn’t it like, two days ago that I just pointed out that the big flaw with IE is that the old versions create a web design nightmare? *tap tap* .. Apparently this thing is turned on?

What does it test?

Actually the tool is a suite of tests with some specific test cases for IE browser specific issues.

Here’s a list of categories it will test and report on without setting up a ‘Site Owner’ account:

  • Fix common problems from supporting old versions of IE:
  • Known compatibility issues
  • Compatibility Mode
  • Frameworks & libraries
  • Web standards docmode
  • Help this webpage work well across browsers, across devices:
  • CSS prefixes
  • Browser plug-ins
  • Responsive web design
  • Browser detection
  • Consider building with some new features in Windows 8:
  • Touch browsing default
  • Start screen site tile

If you plug your URL in the page will test all these areas and report back to you where improvements could be made.

Additionally there is a direct link to the ‘Pinned Site Tile’ testing/design tool.

This tool lets you select an image (144×144 pixel PNG) and text for your website when a Windows 8 user wants to ‘Pin’ the site to their start menu.

My experience with the tool wasn’t great, likely due to some caching, but if you test your code against sites that do work properly you can still sort out the needed meta tags quickly enough.

Other Goodies?

Included in the suite is a link to the Internet Explorer Test Drive site to compare HTML5 features and performance with other browsers..

 
Technically, I ended up short on time to cover more, so if you dive in and start to wonder why we didn’t point out something new/interesting, feel free to let us know, we’re always open to feedback. :)

SEO news blog post by @ 12:20 pm


 

 

January 7, 2013

The Windows 8 Gamble with Touch Technology

After a reluctant (and even hostile) reception to its new operating system, Windows 8, it seems that Microsoft has taken a billion-dollar gamble that the future of personal computing is touch technology.

gorilla
Most of us are very familiar with touch technology; it has been incredibly successful. We use it every day on our smartphones, kiosks, and tablet computers, but with Windows 8, Microsoft is assuming (hoping) that users will find Windows 8 so attractive that they will want to use it the millions of home PCs around the world.

There are three main differences between tablet screens and a PC screen usage: the angle, distance and time interval; which iterates why touch technology is appropriate in some instances, and not in others.

While many are seeing touch technology for the first time, touch technology was originally introduced in the 1980s. The reason it didn’t catch on then, was due to a problem referred to at the time as “gorilla arm.” Repeated use of touch screens in a PC environment revealed that a painful condition that would arise with its users. Symptoms included a tingling ache from incurred from the repetitive stress injuries were associated with prolonged touch screen usage. Some experts say gorilla arm is what killed touch computing during its first wave in the early 1980s. The other issue of course comes from finger-grease. It is easy enough to clean of your smartphone, but it is certainly not convenient on a large monitor.

This recent gambit by Microsoft seems to show tangible desperateness of the once mighty software company as it struggles to remain as a leader in the computer world. It may be that we are seeing the final death throes of the failing giant as it places all its energies into the uncertain future of touch technology and its Windows operating system. Some have argued that the death of the PC is inevitable; but until such time as a new superior interface comes along, the future of PC usage will remain largely unchanged.

SEO news blog post by @ 11:28 am


 

 

December 11, 2012

Thinking of making an ‘App’ for the Apple Store?

You may want to re-think that decision, perhaps even focus on a ‘mobile’ provider for your site, or an Android app instead of one for Apple’s store.

Rotten Apple with bite mark

Why? Well lets list the reasons:

- Android OS is shipping on more phones currently than any other mobile OS
- 2013 should be the year that Android overtakes iPhone in subscriber #s
- A mobile ‘face lift’ should load on any phone/browser
- Apple is cracking down on all ‘Apps’ that generate revenue outside their store..

The last one is a real kicker, especially for Microsoft who is currently unable to update their SkyDrive app after Apple realized it was handling in-app purchases without going through the Apple Store.

Essentially Apple is rejecting all Microsoft app updates and 3rd party apps that communicate with SkyDrive until Microsoft has a solution to Apple’s need for a 30% cut of all transactions done through it’s App Store.

So if you made an Apple Store ‘App’ for your site, all you can do with the ‘App’ is browse information and provide free resources, since any attempt to engage in a financial transaction would require the Apple App Store to participate, at a 30% margin.

That’s just.. wait for it.. rotten.

Making Easy Money by Ignoring Copyright Infringement

A North Korean Won with Park Jae-sang's face.

On the surface, it may seem counter-intuitive to your profit margin, but not letting people steal your content could be what’s stopping you from getting rich.

PSY, the chubby Korean behind the most popular YouTube video to-date, is raking in the profits from his ‘Gangnam Style’ video, and it’s all because he didn’t censor his own work by chasing copyright violations.

If you look at TV commercials, ad revenue, product endorsements, and other direct revenue from his popularity, PSY is making over $8 Million in 2012 alone.

Clearly there’s a trade off between copyrights and profits that doesn’t favor always locking down your content.

I’m wondering though, once fame has taken hold, if next year we’ll have a story about PSY suing people for copyright infringements?

SEO news blog post by @ 12:59 pm


 

 

November 29, 2012

The Karaoke Web Standard

KWS Side bar image

Well Microsoft has finally managed to get a leg up on all the current desktop web browsers available today with it’s new Karaoke Web Standard.

KWS Logo

To quote the KWS wiki entry:

This specification defines a new API, focused on semantic language processing for two-way communication with a remote host. Eschewing typical binary protocols, this new interface creates a system-to-system forced sonic recognition on the receiving party.

The KWS definition page goes on to discuss key points like pending API access to the libation ES codebase, and encourages modification from the base parameters noting that each user has unique aptitudes in variety of related skills.

Indeed while some users, such as myself, have a low threshold for personal embarrassment (regardless of how many times a week I write these posts), I could possess high vocal aptitude that would mitigate a fond user experience if I were to stick with preset templates.

The spec deals with concerns such as bitrate, throttling, error mitigation, audio auth rights, P2P connectivity, and semantic packet delivery, but fails to touch on less favourable issues like hackers that implement auto-tuning modules.

Included with the announcement were two YouTube videos, one that explains the need for the new standard:

 
And a second video that focuses on presenting the new KWS:

 
Oddly the videos came along with a link “thebrowseryoulovedtohate.com” that’s got an extra ‘d’ in every instance?

Come back with my imaginary horse!
The theme is apparently along the lines of “Have you tried IE Lately?”, with the assumption that you’ll like what you see.

 
I’m personally assuming that next week someone on the IE marketing team will get a phat bonus for a spike in downloads that doesn’t correlate to actual user shift.
 

FireFox 64bit?

Waterfox Logo

In related news, FireFox has given up on 64bit development for now, listing a number of issues that make it a very wise decision, regardless of the folks that were ‘enjoying’ the struggle of maintaining a 64bit browser with very little 64bit extension support.

While a 64bit FireFox could theoretically run faster, the added expense of development was taxing the coders and holding back the progress of the browser vs. it’s competition.

If you MUST have a 64bit FireFox there is a build of FF with 64bit support, it’s called ‘WaterFox‘ and you can get it from Sourceforge.

Since I already had FireFox installed I grabbed the portable copy of WaterFox and it runs great, picking up most, if not all, of my FireFox profile/settings.

Personally? I’m using Chrome, and I am writing plugins for Chrome because I feel it’s going to win the browser war thanks to Android, Apple, and many other systems that use the WebKit engine by default.

SEO news blog post by @ 10:50 am


 

 

November 6, 2012

Dogpile on Apple Day!

Dogpile on Apple

Clearly someone neglected to remind me that November 6th is the international Dog Pile on Apple Day!?

Lets take a look at a popular technology subreddit..

Not r/applesucks, just r/technology:

Those are just the current headlines!

Last week we had a great story about internal politics in Apple, and the firing of Scott Forstall, a 15 year vet managing the Apps team.

Some folks felt that the departure was due to a change of attitude at Apple, from Jobs to Cook, where people unwilling to apologize aren’t welcome.

Others look at how Scott handled himself inside the company, acting out much like Jobs did, but without Jobs around he was making enemies instead of friends. Indeed Bob Mansfield cancelled retirement plans with Apple and agreed to 2 more years upon news of Scott’s firing.

It can’t be all that bad really, since Apple sold over 3 million iPads last weekend alone?

Plus, now that Apple lost the legal challenge over money owed to Motorola over patent licences it can just give up all intention of paying.

In fact many observers agree it was Apple’s lack of interest in following the law that cost them the case.

To paraphrase a really good reply to the decision:

Why this was dismissed with prejudice:
Apple wanted the judge to set license fees, but said that they would not agree to the ruling of the judge unless she set it at less than $1 per device.

The judge essentially said, fine, since Apple won’t adhere to legal judgements, Apple’s case is pointless.
The last ditch attempt to say Apple might adhere to legal judgements hasn’t swayed me, I dismiss the case, and Apple can’t bring it to trial further.

Why even bother with a trial when the plaintiff has made it clear they do not respect the law or the potential decision?

If I knew this judge I’d be pleading her to let me take her out for a free meal as a thank you.

So folks, if you see an Apple laying in the gutter, taking a power nap, just know that it’s hard being green.

SEO news blog post by @ 12:07 pm


 

 

October 23, 2012

Wintergrate: Windows 8 Integrated

Steve Ballmer wearing a santa hat.

It’s fall and soon it will be winter, with Old St. Ballmer putting an integrated Windows 8, with integrated Internet Explorer, under the tree for Christmas this year, learning a new UI is all we have to fear.

Yes we’ve said it before and we’ll say it again, you’ll have to re-learn Windows to love Windows 8.

So then you might ask, “Why bother learning Windows if I have to learn something new?“, which is where this post becomes informative.

Windows 8 isn’t trying to teach old dogs new tricks for the sake of being different; that’s someone else’s logo/catchphrase. Microsoft wants to integrate your devices and applications so that your efforts with one product aren’t wasted in another product.

What’s all this integrated brouhaha? Well this video shows you a sample of it:

That’s pretty cool stuff, and if you have embraced Microsoft products, say you have an XBox based Car-PC, this sort of integration tech between your smart phone or your tablet would really make you glad you invested with Microsoft.

The thing that gets me is that if my phone is over in the corner recharging, and I don’t own a surface, how ‘attached’ will I get to touching my screen vs. locating a mouse and keyboard?

If you become hooked on touching what’s that going to cost in terms of a multi-touch screen?

Looking at my local suppliers, a multi-touch 1080p 21″ screen is $200 more than the same screen without the overlay.

While that’s a lot less than it used to cost for an touch overlay equipped screen, it still adds far too much cost to the screen price to justify the usability.

As someone who has worked with touch technology for over 10years, I can also point out that unless you are super careful your touches will wear the screen in the sections you are touching frequently.

So until they are making it easy to remove/swap overlays I’d predict that this will be a bust in a few years if people adopt the current touch solutions for desktop use.

Do you have a hankering to try Windows 8 even without a touch option? It’s really not recommended but you can challenge yourself to trying it out using VirtualBox and either of the ISO files from this handy page: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-8/download (No Signups Needed!)

Search for Life

Google seems to be one step ahead of us, and indeed they have done it again, just weeks after starting a project involving “Conway’s Game of Life“, where I’d suggested we use the algorithm to animate some tiles in a website background.

Having beat me to the punch, I used an image generated from a Google search as the background image of this post.

However, if readers suggest some good images to tile and animate for a fun use of the code, I’m keen for suggestions, as long as they aren’t all along the lines of: “Grab random puppy and kitten images from Google image search and use those for the squares!”

SEO news blog post by @ 11:10 am


 

 

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