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Google stock soars: Titan Aerospace + Public Glass Explorer

It would take a lot of thunderbolts and lightning to frighten a company as resourceful as Google.

After some of the bad news earlier this month, Google had a very good day on the stock market and is soaring high on several big announcements.
 

Google
NASDAQ: GOOG – Apr 15 6:13 PM ET
536.44 +3.92 (0.74%)

 
As of today, April 15th, starting at 6am, Google started taking public orders for the Google Glass Explorer product.

What’s the catch? You have to be a US citizen because the Glass Explorer program is focused on the US and doesn’t have a lot of support for other countries yet. D’oh!

Also, at $1,500, you probably need to have a solid bankroll or a game plan to make the money back by producing videos and taking images that you can promote as ‘through glass’.

The official post on Google Plus took several minutes to finish loading thanks to the comments from people who range from excited, to angry, depending on their global location and access to the needed funds.

There’s no mention of the public access to the Explorer Glass Edition on the official Google Blog, but last week they had Dr. Jane Goodall discussing the tools she used to document and learn about chimpanzee behavior.

When I consider the additional images/video Dr.Goodall would have been able to collect and share if her studies were done with today’s technology/tools, it really boggles my mind.

Still, I don’t have US citizenship, or $1,500 laying around, so all I can do is write with jealousy. :)

Speaking of funds, Google also just purchased Titan Aerospace, the same company that has successfully built self-powered gliders that can sustain an altitude of 65,000 feet for up to three years.
 
Photo of the Solara 50 self powered glider.
 
The only figure that news sites will quote is the $60 million US that Facebook had previously offered to purchase Titan Aerospace, and the assumption is that Google obviously offered even more.

How much is it worth to Google to be able to update Google Maps image data without sharing the cost of satellite images? Millions.

What’s the value of traffic and exposure if Google’s drones can provide near real-time updates of forest fires and other large disasters? Priceless.

These self-powered gliders can apparently supplement Google’s Loon Project which provides internet access to low density population areas using ‘smart’ balloons that use the various wind layers to control their location.

If a balloon is going the wrong direction it can raise or lower to get into a different layer of wind for some limited control of it’s travel. When a balloon needs maintenance it can be deflated slowly to bring it back to ground safely, and in the event of a malfunction there’s a parachute in each balloon.

Currently the Loon project is focused in New Zealand with a future goal of establishing a contiguous ring of balloons around the 40th southern parallel that will provide uninterrupted internet access for anyone living in the 40km range of the ring.

With the purchase of Titan Aerospace and it’s gliders, Google has even more options and folks are already starting to wonder about a hybrid balloon using some of the glider technology that Titan Aerospace is bringing to the table.

Honestly, between selling connectivity and providing discounted image data for Google Earth, this purchase unlocks a ton of potential and could easily pay itself off in short order because Google’s in a great position to actually use the technology.

SEO news blog post by @ 5:00 pm on April 15, 2014


 

Don’t farm the wrong email list..

I am a typist of sorts; I don’t dictate in a court of law, or even have good touch typing skills, but I honestly communicate via typing almost as much as I do with spoken words.

So I have a thing for nice keyboards and I made the mistake of trying out a new product, before it’d been thoroughly tested/reviewed: the Mionix Z60 mechanical keyboard.

It’s a really sturdy well built device with plenty of high end features that were what I wanted in a keyboard, however there were some critical problems with it that caused me to send it back a few times just to get a working unit.

Even after contacting the manufacturer’s support/warranty team on multiple occasions resulting in a few returns/replacements of the KB for one reason or the other I cannot reliably boot PCs with a mouse connected to the Mionix KB I finally ended up with, but I got tired of mailing things around so I just decided to live with the issues.

Yesterday, being April Fools, Dave snuck over to my PC and plugged my mouse into my KB. He already knew this would drive me nuts wondering what’s wrong with my computer till I noticed it and he was right! Curses!

So this morning, when I got 3 copies of a spam email, thanks to my numerous contact efforts, from Mionix advertising yet another crazy custom product, I laughed at the ‘day late’ April Fools joke, but seeing how they had three different email addresses due to my numerous support contact efforts, it was a good reminder:

“Do not send unsolicited advertising to the wrong email list.”

Unsolicited advertising to random people is bad enough, but to dump spam on some people who are frustrated and unhappy with their existing purchases is just reminding them to dislike you.


(Image credit: Terry Border – Bent Objects.)



… Unless you were so keen to get a brand mention that you intentionally contacted upset users hoping for backlash? In that case congrats. :)

SEO news blog post by @ 12:03 pm on April 2, 2014


 

Oculus VR SOLD to Facebook

About an hour ago (it will be by the time I post this) it was announced that Facebook has acquired Oculus VR, makers of the Oculus Rift virtual headset for roughly 2 billion in cash and stocks.

oculusvr soldout

Targeted marketing: Now in 3D!!

If you review the products that Facebook has purchased/acquired recently you’ll see a very consistent logic in going after products that they can control and lock down to their own services. The goal is very simple, get a technology off the public market so you can control it, brand it, and eventually monetize it with user tracking and advertising. All of which are bad for the Oculus VR’s development.

So what was an exciting new product is instantly becoming a pile of speculation and distrust, not even 7 days after the DK2 kit became available for purchase, and exactly 1 week from April Fools?

Talk about ‘deeply’ suspicious folks! In the first half-hour of the news break on Reddit the /r/oculus threads are full of people overusing ‘sell out’ and just pummeling Palmer Lucky, the man who used to call the shots over at Oculus VR, with insults and insinuations.

Just 1 hour ago Minecraft’s Markus Persson (AKA: Notch) has already publicly hit the NOPE button:

While this means that Minecraft won’t officially support the Oculus Rift, it really boils down to needing user-based modifications to support the Oculus hardware as Mojang won’t be wasting time on a Facebook property.

This is just hours after the announcement so I would expect Minecraft to be tip of the iceberg when you really sit down and think about who’s in business with Facebook:

- Microsoft
- Oracle
- Nokia
- Zynga
- etc..

Things over at Facebook are a bit of an axis of evil in terms of IT culture, soliciting a slew of ‘dark side’ remarks from upset users replying to Palmer Lucky’s sale post. It’s my opinion that as many people who would complain about losing access to such a device, there’s many more that would understand that this could be the end of a great thing today.

It reminds me a bit of a movie I watched where there’s a jolly fat kid carrying around his bag of candy pieces only to have a bully come along, steal a candy, stick it in his nose, and then drop it back into the bag with a shake to make sure it’s well sorted.

At this point the entire first page of the Oculus VR subreddit is entirely devoted to negative responses to this news, including this juicy revelation:



People are now shifting interest and focus to other projects and /r/virtualreality just got subbed in for a ton of ex-oculus fans.

SEO news blog post by @ 4:58 pm on March 25, 2014


 

Fire at the Internet Archive’s San Francisco Scanning Center

Last Wednesday, November 6th 2013, at ~ 3:30 in the morning, a fire was detected in the scanning center at the Internet Archive’s San Francisco location.

Fire at the Internet Archive's San Francisco Location

You can read the full story here: Scanning Center Fire Please Help Rebuild While some folks are asking why they don’t have insurance, most are looking at this as a good reminder to make a long overdue contribution to the Internet Archives organization. Archive.org hosts a number of services:

- WebArchive (AKA: The Wayback Machine):

366 Billion web pages saved over time.

Almost everyone should know what this. It’s pretty much the only free to use webpage archive on the internet that snapshots all public-visible pages of major websites over time, saving new versions whenever they are detected. I’ve seen people resurrect major portions of hacked/deleted websites using this service, and as an SEO who often needs to know what sites ‘used’ to look like, this service is invaluable. – Video(or Moving Pictures):

This library contains digital movies uploaded by Archive users which range from classic full-length films, to daily alternative news broadcasts, to cartoons and concerts.

A great collection of free video in many handy formats. We’ve actually used the video clips in the past for posts where we wanted a little video to go along with an SEO post. There’s even some ‘banned cartoons‘ that had to be pulled for one reason or another. – Audio/Music

This library contains recordings ranging from alternative news programming, to Grateful Dead concerts, to Old Time Radio shows, to book and poetry readings, to original music uploaded by our users. Many of these audios and MP3s are available for free download.

This is a great spot for getting free sounds and other audio bits that you might need for a project. I can’t say we’ve used this for ‘SEO’ but the Community Audio section features over 1.3 million recordings that range from kids playing with microphones all the way to nice audio tracks that make good generic ‘hold music’. – Text/Books

Browse and read over 5 million books and items from over 1,500-curated collections. You will find a wide range of literature, historical texts and research materials; and wonderful thematic collections like Children’s Classics, Cookbooks and Genealogy.

While I haven’t spent much time in this portion of the archive, if someone wanted to create unique content from a fresh source, books/texts that have never previously been online might be a great place to start? I’d also wager this section is what was most impacted by the fire. From details included in the initial fire blog post it’s clear that works that were in the process of scanning were lost/damaged but otherwise the main loss is progress and equipment. – Live recordings:

A community committed to providing the highest quality live concerts in a lossless, downloadable format.

The Grateful Dead were early advocates of sharing live recordings and they had a ton of variety in live performances so they are well indexed on the archive. I was listening to their 1972 live performance in the Laeiszhalle. If only I knew more German and could understand some of the cheers from the audience. :)Software:

The collection includes a broad range of software related materials including shareware, freeware, video news releases about software titles, speed runs of actual software game play, previews and promos for software games, high-score and skill replays of various game genres, and the art of filmmaking with real-time computer game engines.

Ever wonder where old ROMs go to die? Well they never die, not with sites like Archive.org making backups of old FTP servers, CDROMs, and other outdated storage mediums. Need an old boot disk, driver, or just want to play some old arcade classics in an emulator? Take a peek!

Old Amiga 1000 with 1084 color screen.. I just threw one of those out last year. Great photo, pitty the advertising isn’t English. Is that ~$2,100 USD?

SEO news blog post by @ 5:30 pm on November 12, 2013


 

Liquid Galaxy: Science Fiction Becomes Fact

Google Earth is definitely one of the most fascinating playthings in the company’s toybox; it was impressive when it launched in 2001 (under the name ‘Keyhole Earthviewer’) and it remains impressive to this day. I remember logging on as a teenager at home and finding the Eiffel Tower in Paris; back then, the only option was a top-down view, and I was disappointed when I tried to change the angles so I could “stand” next to France’s most iconic building. But Google Earth has taken care of that problem; thanks to Street View being integrated into the program, you can zoom into practically anywhere on Earth and roam the streets, exploring cities you’ve never seen from the comfort of your desk.

That’s not all; Google Earth has added data to allow users to zoom in under the oceans, see the Lunar Lander on the surface of the Moon, and even view high-resolution images of Martian terrain scooped from the Mars Orbiter and Exploration Rovers. Google Earth users can even view historical images, traveling back in time to view what certain areas looked like many years ago. You can explore the Wieliczka Salt Mine in Poland and the Prado Museum in Madrid.

NGC_4414_(NASA-med)But one of Google Earth’s most incredible features is the one you probably won’t have heard of; it’s an open-source DIY-capable piece of code that takes one step closer to bringing science fiction tech to life. It’s called Liquid Galaxy, and its description—an ‘immersive Google Earth’—doesn’t do nearly enough justice to the possibilities it can create. You won’t find Liquid Galaxy as a major Google release; its official project page is full of technobabble and source code modifications from engineers all over the world. Part of the beauty of the product is that it can be whatever you want it to be. But when it comes down to it, Liquid Galaxy is a design concept that allows you to project Google Earth onto several screens at once, creating a unified surround view of the world. It was originally developed by some Google employees as an independent project; they wanted to recreate the experience of seeing their geo-product imagery in a more seamless way. Using a few extra Linux workstations, they built a big gazebo-style case that housed eight 55-inch LCD screens, and used a cluster of computers to project Google Earth seamlessly and simultaneously—a combination of the Holodeck and a huge flight simulator.

Liquid Galaxy presents an endless amount of potential for teaching everything from geography to climate change and urban planning; after taking Liquid Galaxy on the road and being met with overwhelming praise, in 2010 Google made their configuration, codes, and schematics public so that anyone could rig up their own version. This makes Liquid Galaxy a fasciatingly unique Google product; while it’s been available to the public for three years, very few people have had firsthand experience with one. Georgia State University has a 48-screen display wall using four Windows 7 machines; NASA has one at the Johnson Space Center. Some can be controlled using Xbox Kinect; others use head tracking software. Liquid Galaxy has been used to run the virtual reality game Second Life, allowing players to truly feel as if they’re stepping into Linden Labs’ simulated universe. One civilian user has even rigged a five-screen Liquid Galaxy to run a Quake 3 mod.

If you’re computer-savvy and itching for a new project, you can find the Liquid Galaxy project here. The site contains how-tos, a guide for where to buy pre-built componenets, and encourages users to post their new enhancements, any defects they find, and what they’ve built with the technology. Liquid Galaxy’s open source means that the possibilities really are endless; with a few high-quality computers and a creative imagination you could end up making your wildest science fiction dreams come true.

SEO news blog post by @ 9:35 am on September 9, 2013


 

Google gives back free WiFi

Google’s New York offices are located in the lower Manhattan neighborhood of Chelsea, and today Google announced free WiFi would be provided to the area.

Expected WiFi coverage area for Free Chelsea WiFi
Expected WiFi coverage area for free Google WiFi in the Chelsea neighborhood.

 
The image above attempts to map the coverage area described as:

“Gansevoort Street and 19th Street, from 8th Avenue to the West Side Highway including the Chelsea Triangle, 14th Street Park, and Gansevoort Plaza”

After 6 years of working in the neighborhood Google was proud to offer free WiFi to the area which has a very high density of students (5,000+) and full time residents.

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer, and Google’s CIO, Ben Fried, got together to make the announcement in public at 10:30 AM EST.

Given the technical nature of the area’s residents, the free Wifi offering should help pull in more tech companies with similar goals.

I know that if Google wanted to give me free internet, I’d gladly take that $60/month savings, and they are offering this to nearly 10,000 residents/businesses?!

You go Google!

Charged up about Bluetooth Batteries

Tethercell

Have you ever wanted to:
- know the charge level of installed batteries
- remotely turn on/off something battery powered
- get a warning when your fire alarm battery is low

Well now you can take control of anything that uses AA batteries, using an iPhone, and later on this will obviously be available to your tablet, laptop, PC, or really anything with Bluetooth.

The Thethercell is a new product from two rocket scientists who actually worked on the SpaceX project.

It’s essentially a AAA battery holder with a AA battery’s dimensions. The holder also has a low-power Bluetooth radio/controller chipset, which allows the battery to be checked, and turned off and on remotely.

Here’s a couple examples I’ve seen that give some idea of uses :

- install in a Click-Light
- put the Click-Light in the garage
- set the Tethercell to ‘auto-on’
- tether to your cell phone
- now you have automatic lighting

Tethercell with battery installed.

- install in a baby monitor
- set low battery alarm
- set timer for on/off periods
- spy on people during certain hours
- batteries will last much longer

- install in an old music player
- tether to a device with motion sensor
- play white noise on the music player
- when motion stops the player switches off
- attach the device to your bed/pillow
- white noise will play until you fall asleep

Since this is a fresh product, still in the ‘prototype’ phase, I’d expect lots more ideas on uses to pop up in the future.

In fact I could see companies which use a lot of batteries looking at this as the ultimate in cost cutting/waste management options. The entry point is minimal, and the product itself is likely to be less than $10/each once the economy of scale has taken effect.

SEO news blog post by @ 11:48 am on January 8, 2013


 

Video Ads Planned for FB Timelines

Co-Workers and clients ask me why I stopped using MSN Messenger, like it’s a surprise to them that I don’t willingly sign into an application that spends most of it’s time trying to download videos/advertisements to distract me?

To me the more advertisements I see on a service the more I see that service as coming to an end, with one final attempt to monetize the fleeting popularity of the service at it’s peak of it’s traffic volume.

So clearly then Facebook is signalling that now is the time to monetize and cash out, with executives promising video advertisement opportunities in 2013.

TV Staticfacebook video

To quote the original article on AdAge:

“By April at the latest, it(FB) will offer video advertisers the chance to target video ads to large numbers of Facebook users in their news feeds on both the desktop version of Facebook as well as on Facebook apps on mobile phones and tablets.”

There’s also some advanced speculation that the goal will be to keep the video adverts capped at 15 seconds, which would help minimize the amount of data transfer that is wasted on content you never wanted to see in the first place.

Additionally, if advertisers have to compete in 15 seconds or less, this could produce ‘light’ video spots that are then re-used on other sites around the web, hopefully just replacing existing clips that are 30 seconds.

To the advertisers out there (some of which are our clients) this means that if you were in the planning/edit stages of a video promotion for your site, and social media was one of your target audiences, then you would do well to plan on a 15 second version of your clip in advance.

Speaking of Video Advertising

What would happen if YouTube paid a handful of the most popular YouTube video creators together to make a ‘popular mashup’?

I think this is what would happen (this is NOT the cheap re-mix you may be expecting):

[iframe width="549" height="309" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/iCkYw3cRwLo?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen][/iframe]

Felicia Day and Minecraft? It’s almost like I helped make this.

 
Nice work YouTube! Clearly, at 28million (and counting) hits since it was released on Monday, people can’t get too much of a good thing, which is shocking considering how overplayed some of those videos are, especially the Gangnam Style remixes.

The end of the clip has some references to the video sources, some of which were fresh links for this old dog. ;)

SEO news blog post by @ 12:28 pm on December 20, 2012


 

Complying With the Law, or Running for Cover?

While a lot changes day to day in the SEO world, most of it is of far too little interest or substance to report on, so occasionally we’ll allow ourselves the flexibility to get off topic.

In Canada we have some insanely bad internet service. I’m talking about all things considered, performance, price, and options.

In my province some communities have been noted as having the highest density (per-capita) of internet connected households in the world, yet we have some of the worst internet providers imaginable.

The two biggest names, Shaw and Telus, are well known for imposing caps and disconnecting repeated offenders of copyright violations.

A smaller brand of ISP, TekSavvy, has been making inroads for years, and offers two unique perks:
- Unlimited internet plans (no data caps)
- Data use between 2am -> 8am is ignored

Both those perks are HUGE selling points for folks that love to fill their drives with movies, music, and other wonders of the internet.

So it wasn’t much of a surprise then that Voltage Pictures is specifically chasing after TekSavvy customers for violations of copyright on several movies.

TekSavvy is in a legal Hurt Locker

Initially TekSavvy refused legal action to hand over client information requested by Voltage Pictures, stating that the privacy of it’s clients came first.

This drew TekSavvy into court with Voltage Pictures for the purposes of forcing them to relinquish information on their subscribers.

Today we’re now hearing that Voltage Pictures successfully intimidated TekSavvy into agreeing with the ‘motion for discovery’ after it became clear that the legal indemnity of the ISP was coming into question due to the assistance TekSavvy is providing it’s clients, who are potentially criminals that owe reparations.

For you see, this year, on June 29th, Canada implemented the Copyright Modernization Act which essentially separates the actions of the clientele from the interests of the ISP.

To put that into Hollywood Logic:

Just because your users download cars, it does not mean that the ISP is a used car dealership..

If TekSavvy had continued to block access to their private client records, they felt it would make them liable for the crimes of it’s clients.

And yet in 2004 when BMG music went after Canada’s largest ISPs, Rogers, Bell, Videotron, Telus, and Shaw, with an almost identical request for client information to proceed with legal action, they lost in court, and in appeals.

Thus many people are questioning if TekSavvy really should have backed down.

It’s not all over yet however!

The ‘Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic’ or CIPPIC filed a letter with the court explaining that more time was needed for both the potential defendants, and for preparation of an application intervene in the motion.

The court agreed, after much protest from Voltage Pictures’ prosecutors, and will grant the adjournment until Jan 14th 2013.

TekSavvy still has the option to change it’s mind, and at least 2000 of it’s customers are motivated into pressuring them to do so.

Currently the TekSavvy forum (private/members only) has a single thread on the issue, and it’s pretty quiet, almost too quiet?

I’m no lawyer but I doubt we want any precedent in terms of ISPs divulging private details of it’s clients to companies wishing to prosecute.

SEO news blog post by @ 12:05 pm on December 18, 2012


 

#DROIDRAGE Back-Fires and Creates #WINDOWSRAGE

#WINDOWSRAGE

Microsoft is spending an increasing amount of resources on pointing out the faults of it’s competition, reviving the #DROIDRAGE hash-tag at a moment in time when most Android users have very little to rage about.

For me it’s like watching some high-school bully try and make light of his own faults by pointing out the problems with one of the best students in school; Ultimately running out of complaints and resorting to childish tactics in an attempt to keep themselves from looking bad.

In this case the best student is pretty popular, and the insults have backfired on the bully, leaving the bully (Microsoft in this example) feeling like they are standing in public with their pants around their ankles.

The net today is bubbling with annoyed Windows users sharing their frustrations.

For me, a non-mobile PC user, I have general beefs like:

DirectX 11.x will be for Windows8 only?!

Microsoft Security Essentials is getting merged into Windows Defender?!

But if you take a swim through the #windowsrage hash-tag on Twitter you will see a lot of Windows Mobile, XBox, and other flavors of rage against Microsoft’s products.

Meanwhile, Google’s Saving the World..

While I’ve yet to see Google chase after Microsoft’s reputation, it might just be due to them having no time for it, what with all the awesome things Google’s been doing around our planet.

Google Drones seek out poachers

Like a $5 million dollar grant from Google to the WWF that’s getting spent on unmanned aerial ‘drones’. While the WWF doesn’t want to call them ‘drones’ because of military references to the term, that’s pretty much what they are.

Unlike the military’s drones however, these unmanned aerial watchdogs won’t be rigged for anything more than surveillance of the vast areas of land that the WWF protects.

In fact from what I can tell these will just be ‘commercial’ versions of the drones you see hobbyists and flight enthusiasts playing around with.

The $5 million is actually a small part of the $23 million total funding that Google is providing, this year alone, to non-profit organizations with challenges surrounding technology and innovation as part of Google’s Impact Awards Program.

I doubt that’s much of a ‘slag’ on the competition, but apparently Google has bigger goals than mocking/slandering competing companies?

SEO news blog post by @ 12:44 pm on December 6, 2012


 

The Karaoke Web Standard

KWS Side bar image

Well Microsoft has finally managed to get a leg up on all the current desktop web browsers available today with it’s new Karaoke Web Standard.

KWS Logo

To quote the KWS wiki entry:

This specification defines a new API, focused on semantic language processing for two-way communication with a remote host. Eschewing typical binary protocols, this new interface creates a system-to-system forced sonic recognition on the receiving party.

The KWS definition page goes on to discuss key points like pending API access to the libation ES codebase, and encourages modification from the base parameters noting that each user has unique aptitudes in variety of related skills.

Indeed while some users, such as myself, have a low threshold for personal embarrassment (regardless of how many times a week I write these posts), I could possess high vocal aptitude that would mitigate a fond user experience if I were to stick with preset templates.

The spec deals with concerns such as bitrate, throttling, error mitigation, audio auth rights, P2P connectivity, and semantic packet delivery, but fails to touch on less favourable issues like hackers that implement auto-tuning modules.

Included with the announcement were two YouTube videos, one that explains the need for the new standard:

[iframe width="550" height="309" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/lD9FAOPBiDk?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen][/iframe]

 
And a second video that focuses on presenting the new KWS:

[iframe width="550" height="309" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/dAecpAcyFCw?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen][/iframe]

 
Oddly the videos came along with a link “thebrowseryoulovedtohate.com” that’s got an extra ‘d’ in every instance?

Come back with my imaginary horse!
The theme is apparently along the lines of “Have you tried IE Lately?”, with the assumption that you’ll like what you see.

 
I’m personally assuming that next week someone on the IE marketing team will get a phat bonus for a spike in downloads that doesn’t correlate to actual user shift.
 

FireFox 64bit?

Waterfox Logo

In related news, FireFox has given up on 64bit development for now, listing a number of issues that make it a very wise decision, regardless of the folks that were ‘enjoying’ the struggle of maintaining a 64bit browser with very little 64bit extension support.

While a 64bit FireFox could theoretically run faster, the added expense of development was taxing the coders and holding back the progress of the browser vs. it’s competition.

If you MUST have a 64bit FireFox there is a build of FF with 64bit support, it’s called ‘WaterFox‘ and you can get it from Sourceforge.

Since I already had FireFox installed I grabbed the portable copy of WaterFox and it runs great, picking up most, if not all, of my FireFox profile/settings.

Personally? I’m using Chrome, and I am writing plugins for Chrome because I feel it’s going to win the browser war thanks to Android, Apple, and many other systems that use the WebKit engine by default.

SEO news blog post by @ 10:50 am on November 29, 2012


 

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