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iOS popularity = Big Bills for Bing Hating

We decided to call a spade a spade, and Google is paying a fee to keep Bing from being the default search engine on iOS.

The fee is based on per-unit pricing, and not only are there more units than ever, but the per-unit price is also going from $3.20 last year to an estimated $3.50 per unity in 2013!

A flock of sheep attempting to enter a building with an apple logo at the same time.
Given the growing user base these should almost be rabbits?

 
Since the prices are a guesstimate, one can honestly say that it will cost more for the exclusive right to the default search engine on iOS in 2013.

However there are certain ‘publications’ that have forgone the guessing part and are rather certain that Google will pay up.

For example..

Techcrunch title: GOOGLE TO PAY APPLE 1 BILLION
An honest title: GOOGLE COULD PAY APPLE 1 BILLION

In fact, if Samsung, or Google (via it’s Motorolla Mobillity acquisition), can keep one-upping each of the new iPhones, then the cost of licensing to the user-base will be peaking at a point which it will never return to again.

But is it worth the money knowing how much of a search advantage Google has over Bing? Well that depends entirely on who you ask!

Apple pundit:

People will use whatever is the default like pack of blind sheep. Everyone knows this.

Google fan:

If that’s true then why is the Google Maps app on iOS the most popular app on the device? People clearly don’t just use the default apple maps?

.. and really, if we’re talking about users who skipped over the BlackBerries, Nokias, Samsungs, etc.., for a specific device, then perhaps we should give them some credit for also choosing a better search experience?

After all, how many times would you let your phone load Bing before trying to switch it?

I personally would let a ‘Bing’ search happen once at the most, just to get info on “setting default search engine on iOS”. :)

SEO news blog post by @ 5:08 pm on February 14, 2013


 

That escalated quickly: Google Glass prices, dates, and a spec leak?

I’ve talked about Google Glass already, Finnish them! (Google Glasses and WiFi Liabillity), Google Chronos?, Google develops ARGs for Pirates, many times..

In those articles we were mostly looking at patents and prototypes.

Now we have WIRED.COM and arstechnica.com both spewing out specs based on more patents and some developer info…

A bone conduction listening device.
Hello? Can you ear me?
  • 802.11 b/g 2.4 GHz WLAN
  • Bluetooth ver 4.0 low-energy radio
  • “Bone Conduction” audio playback
  • a $1,500 (£962) price tag
  • developer shipments in early 2013
  • a projected 2014 launch date

Breaking this down, we learn a fair bit from each fact we can establish.

802.11 b/g support means that N mode WiFi won’t likely be supported, and the best guess would be the it’s getting dropped due to power consumption. Additionally, there’s a rumor that the primary data connection for the Google Glass will be a tethered cell phone acting as a ‘modem’ of sorts to expand the Google Glass’s communications range without bulking it up.

The 4.0 version of the Bluetooth radio stack is an exceptionally good match for a device running off of batteries, that sits on your head. This version of the Bluetooth stack supports BLE – Bluetooth Low Energy mode operations that allow a device like Google glass to sip on power and still remain connected to other devices.

If Google Glass had an option to support class 1 (100mW transmissions) networks it would supply you with a range of up to 328′ or 100 meters. If you were a household cleaner you could leave your phone in a central location, put on your Google glasses, and record your cleaning efforts directly to your phone or relay it to a remote server. By doing this you could safe guard yourself against damage claims and other issues presented by the homeowners.

In fact you could also be listening to some music, without blocking your ability to hear other sounds, like a knock at the door, or someone coming home. This is because the Google glass does not block incoming sounds/cover your ears.

The ‘bone conduction‘ audio drivers on the Google Glass send audio vibrations via your skull bones to your inner ear which then ‘hears’ the vibrations as sound.

This means that if you are driving, biking, walking, etc., you can expect the Google Glass audio feedback to be less of an obstruction/safety risk than typical in-ear or over-ear style systems.

Picture wearing these as a lawyer, and someone is attempting to hold you to words you’ve never even said. You could jump to the date/time the original discussion occurred and play it back verbatim, clearing up any mistakes/poor recollection that might otherwise cause endless headaches.

The trick in this case, since a lawyer/doctor, couldn’t ethically record video to an insecure/public location like a ‘Google Hangout’, would be for Google to either offer some sort of private video storage/search/retrieval service (I hear they have some experience with video?), that has the sufficient security clearances to avoid any concerns about storage.

The $1,500.00 price tag is for the Developer’s build of the device, currently being called the ‘Explorer Edition’, that will be shipping this year. In fact Google has said “early this year” as the date, so “sooner than later” is a fine guesstimate.

The signup for the Explorer Edition was actually quite the event, while the attendees were sitting in the conference center Google dropped some ‘Glass’ equipped sky-divers onto the site from an overhead balloon. The video from their Glass units was then streamed inside the event for a bit of a surreal effect.

At the end of the conference the developers willing to pay the $1,500.00 price tag were given a specially etched slate of glass with the serial # of the unit they will be shipping to you later.

A glass brick with a serial number etched into it.
Ooooh my precious.. So shiny..

SEO news blog post by @ 10:44 am on February 7, 2013


 

Are you Modern? Take the test!

modern.IE Logo

Two pro-Microsoft posts in one week? I know, Right?!

Clearly we are not masters of fate or IT news, so today’s headline is covering the new modern:IE Test Site setup to assist web developers with creating IE compatible site content.

Wasn’t it like, two days ago that I just pointed out that the big flaw with IE is that the old versions create a web design nightmare? *tap tap* .. Apparently this thing is turned on?

What does it test?

Actually the tool is a suite of tests with some specific test cases for IE browser specific issues.

Here’s a list of categories it will test and report on without setting up a ‘Site Owner’ account:

  • Fix common problems from supporting old versions of IE:
  • Known compatibility issues
  • Compatibility Mode
  • Frameworks & libraries
  • Web standards docmode
  • Help this webpage work well across browsers, across devices:
  • CSS prefixes
  • Browser plug-ins
  • Responsive web design
  • Browser detection
  • Consider building with some new features in Windows 8:
  • Touch browsing default
  • Start screen site tile

If you plug your URL in the page will test all these areas and report back to you where improvements could be made.

Additionally there is a direct link to the ‘Pinned Site Tile’ testing/design tool.

This tool lets you select an image (144×144 pixel PNG) and text for your website when a Windows 8 user wants to ‘Pin’ the site to their start menu.

My experience with the tool wasn’t great, likely due to some caching, but if you test your code against sites that do work properly you can still sort out the needed meta tags quickly enough.

Other Goodies?

Included in the suite is a link to the Internet Explorer Test Drive site to compare HTML5 features and performance with other browsers..

 
Technically, I ended up short on time to cover more, so if you dive in and start to wonder why we didn’t point out something new/interesting, feel free to let us know, we’re always open to feedback. :)

SEO news blog post by @ 12:20 pm on January 31, 2013


 

Feeling Old: Child of the 90s

Being a youthful person (aka: I never grew up) you could say I was a child of the 90s, but in all honesty, this new ‘Child of the 90s’ video promotion, from the marketing team behind Internet Explorer, just makes me feel old…

[iframe width="550" height="309" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/qkM6RJf15cg?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen][/iframe]
I’m pretty sure that generation YoYo came earlier & what’s up with that Apple II?

 
When I was young we had:
- 300baud vs. 56k
- 5.25″ vs. 3.5″
- monochrome vs. color
- Garfield™ vs. puppies
- Donkey Kong vs. Tamagotchi
- Handi-Snacks vs. Lunchables
- hockey cards vs. pogs

So it’s pretty close to my generation, but still makes me feel old.

Does it make me feel any affinity for IE, as if I can relate to it’s embarrassing past after remembering fanny packs?

Not really. It makes me remember when Netscape decided to put expiry dates on their browser so I was forced to install IE only for fear of support calls asking how to update Netscape.

Still, not a positive moment for IE, just being the browser that ’caused the least issues’, wasn’t much of a title?

How has that changed? Well now IE is, in my circles, the browser that that ’causes the most issues’.

So they grew up, but not the way we’d like, and until they expire all the old copies of IE laying around or break off to a new product name with zero ties to old IE issues, I thin IE is stuck with the ‘difficult child’ image.

When I was a kid..

When I was a kid we had electron guns we’d sit in front of, and the only thing between us and the gun firing electrons was a glass plate.

Child watching TVGun
People said it wasn’t good, told us to keep our distance..

 
Now with Samsung offering curved OLED screens they are urging us to get close, saying that the screens offer an immersive experience:

Child watching TV

 
OLED technology means less emissions, heat, and power consumption than almost any full color display technology available today.

As someone with less than 55″ inches of screen space curved around him right this moment, I’d have to say that this first screen will make it’s purchasers VERY happy once it comes to market and stops being a poster child for what’s coming.

Displays need to step-up indeed, what with all the 3d options coming out, including the very exciting Oculus Rift that’s been generating some interesting reaction videos (WARNING: Strong Language/Reactions):

[iframe width="550" height="309" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/KJo12Hz_BVI?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen][/iframe]
Candid Anthony didn’t seem very impressed until he tried it..

 
So while folks were saying the next step in displays will be to plug into our brains, it appears that we are finding another step closer without the brain jack. ;)

SEO news blog post by @ 1:30 pm on January 29, 2013


 

Oracle is meddling with search results?!

Like most headlines, there’s some leaping between facts going on, but we’ll connect the dots in short order, don’t you fret.

Scooby Doo Cartoon with additional logos
We want our Google results, not some Mystery Machine!?

 
Have you noticed how much/often Oracle has been updating Java on your machine lately?

You’d think, with all those security patches they are fixing, if you turned on a PC that has been dormant for 6 months it would be instantly hacked by it’s outdated Java upon loading nearly any web page?

Well that’s not exactly true, so what is true?

Here’s a list:

  • Oracle gets page traffic with each update
  • Ask.com pays for each install of the Ask Toolbar
  • By default the Ask.com toolbar is installed
  • Each update is a risk you won’t opt-out and click next
  • The Ask.com install waits 10 mins to install
  • Delayed invisible installs are a malware tactic
  • The Ask.com toolbar intercepts and modifies searches
  • Removing Ask’s toolbar won’t restore your search settings

Those are facts, and it doesn’t take a silver-tongued writer to get the reader to acknowledge how they all connect.

It’s so bad that IE, FireFox, and Chrome are all delivering UI changes to make these installs a LOT more clear to the end user..

.. and Ask.com has already started adding ‘helpers’ to make the new UI’s less likely to halt an installation where the user is just clicking along.

So it’s a back and forth struggle to keep your web browser free from unwanted clutter that pretends to be of value but actually alters your search results and steers you towards paid sites/links vs. organic search results.

How can you opt out of the war for your clicks?

If you don’t need Java, just don’t install it to begin with. If you hit something that needs Java then go ahead and use it; But don’t just install Java because you think it’s crucial.

You also don’t want to confuse JavaScript with Java; For some folks the Oracle Java installation can be completely avoided.

Use a clean installer without the added Ask.com payload. Since Oracle isn’t publishing any recent versions of the Java installer without the Ask.com toolbar components, this requires you to trust an outside 3rd party’s assistance, or use a risky/outdated version of Java.

Ninite icon
Ninite.com

What can I say about Ninite.com? In my nerdy travels online I’ve yet to discover an easier method of installing apps without the added payloads.

Not only that, but Ninite allows you to bundle up a ton of installs into one package with zero ‘next’ clicking as the packages install. Heck, you can even save the package URL for later, or share it with friends to help them install a specific set of apps!

Since Ninite grabs the source from the actual websites, you will get trusted/current code, without the bother of carefully installing each app and side-skirting all the additional packaged software/malware.

Plus as a one-stop reference to the most popular free installations, Ninite is also great for folks that want to stick with mainstream applications and avoid trying out some ‘less popular’ choices.

I hope this helps our readers avoid some hassles, get honest search results from the search engine you’ve selected, and perhaps even gives folks the motivation to try uninstalling Java completely to see just what the heck is using it anyways.

SEO news blog post by @ 1:31 pm on January 22, 2013


 

Journalist Freedoms: How to trample on a mouse and turn it into an elephant?

A mouse

What do you do when your paid columnist wants to write about a product that is the demise of your revenue stream, and give the product an editor’s choice award?

Well that’s exactly what happened over at CNet when the Dish Network’s ‘Hopper’ DVR w/Sling was picked for a ‘Best of Show – Editor’s Choice Award’ by CNet staff.

Apparently the fact that this DVR eliminates commercials entirely, and then lets you watch the recordings from almost any internet connected device, is a big concern for the large media companies.

At one point the new DVR had CBS saying they wouldn’t have anything to do with Dish network if they proceeded with taking this device to market.

It’s enough of a threat that CBS, along with many other ‘major media companies’, have taken legal action against Dish and it’s ‘Hopper DVR’. In fact, this legal action was prior to the addition of the Sling services which threaten to further trample on their corporate profits.

Given this legal action, and the potential risk to bottom line revenue that the DVR implies, CBS directly ordered CNet to remove the Hopper from the running and re-vote on the remaining devices.

This directive allegedly came right from the CEO of CBS, Leslie Moonves, and was given to Mark Larkin, the GM of CBS Interactive News.

Mr.Larkin fought the decision while he could, getting into conference calls with CNet and CBS heads to try and avoid censoring the product.

Ultimately he was forced, against his wishes, to deliver the decree to CNet editorial staff; A task that, according to The Verge, brought him to tears:

“Sources say that Larkin was distraught while delivering the news — at one point in tears — as he told the team that he had fought CBS executives who had made the decision.”

Not only that, but CNET was barred from issuing their own statement about the removal of the DVR from the awards, and had to use a prepared statement from CBS regarding the legal issues surrounding the Hopper DVR!

Here is that official statement:

The Dish Hopper with Sling was removed from consideration due to active litigation involving our parent company CBS Corp. We will no longer be reviewing products manufactured by companies with which we are in litigation with respect to such product.

Immediately, Greg Sandoval, a regular CNET columnist, offered his resignation and went public on his Twitter feed about the incident.

Greg Sandoval's Twitter Post

Lindsey Turrentine, one of the ‘heads’ in the conference call with Mark Larkin, and the Editor-in-Chief of CNET News, took a moment to apologize for the situation, and for not resigning immediately when she had the chance.

Lindsey defended her decision, stating that she didn’t want to abandon her team and she felt she could affect change easier from her current position than if she were to resign.

Her full post is over here (at least for now): http://news.cnet.com/8301-30677_3-57563877-244/the-2013-best-of-ces-awards-cnets-story/

So essentially they could have let the whole thing slip by, and tried to avoid adding fuel to the fire.

Instead CBS has lit a bonfire that can be seen across the world, and now everyone’s hearing about the Dish Hopper DVR.

In journalism circles we call this the Streisand_effect.

 

Gonzo Journalism

What if you paid a writer, who specializes in gaming topics, to go cover a Panasonic Toughpad press event and he decided to get drunk and channel Hunter S. Thompson?

Well that’s exactly what Grant from ‘LOOK, ROBOT’ did for his coverage of the Toughpad:

“[January 14, 2013]Panasonic are launching a new tablet computer for the business market. I am not a tech journalist. I have never done this before. I don’t know what’s going on.”

You can read the whole thing here, it’s a lot of fun, and if you’ve ever been to one of these events you should be able to relate to most of his observations in one way or another.

All press is good press?

Well the folks over at Speed-Sew™ certainly seem to think they can get away with anything in promoting their products:
[iframe width="549" height="309" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/rtU3wbkRAEg?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen][/iframe]

I also keep pulling out the same old tube of Speed-Sew™, pop the cap off, wonder if it’s still good, and then sniff it!

It doesn’t smell good, and it’s not like it gives you a ‘buzz’, it’s as illogical as smelling your shoes when you already know they are going to smell awful.

By doing something in their YouTube video that I can relate to, by making the video down to earth, and funny, I am now motivated to laugh and share.

I want to say this is brilliant social media/video advertising, but sadly it’s a bad example because it has yet to go viral (some adverts never do).

Let’s give it a nudge shall we?

SEO news blog post by @ 1:05 pm on January 15, 2013


 

Missing Authorship Photos?

If you’ve become accustomed to seeing your charming mug in the SERPs when you are Google’ing your keywords, it might be rather unsettling to see those images suddenly disappear.

Rich Snippet SERP example

Fear not! This isn’t something you have done, or not done, this is actually kicking up a bit of fuss on the SEO forums/discussion areas today and clearly looks to be an issue on Google’s end.

In fact if you were in need of reassurance, all you have to do is hop into your Webmaster Tools account, and visit the ‘Rich Snippets Tool‘ to get a preview of what your SERPs would normally look like.

If you are sure that you’re not part of the current issue, or you’re just curious what we’re talking about, the Troubleshooting Rich Snippets page is a great resource to tackle possible problems.

Google invests another $200,000,000.00 in renewable energy..

I could have written .2 billion, or 200 million, or even 200 thousand thousands, but why play with such a large sum of money?

Google certainly isn’t playing around; With this latest investment Google’s grand total in renewable/clean energy is over $1 billion US and growing.

This isn’t just charity either, some of these investments are just smart business because the returns are very fixed and low risk.

Illustration of power saved by using GMail vs. Postal Mail

Being honest about pollution is brave, and bragging about your low footprint is begging for trouble, but Google marches on stating:

“100 searches on Google has about the same footprint as drying your hands with a standard electric dryer, ironing a shirt, or producing 1.5 tablespoons of orange juice.”

You can read more about Google’s efforts to reduce, eliminate, and assist others with power consumption/carbon footprints, over on the Google Green Pages.

SEO news blog post by @ 11:57 am on January 10, 2013


 

Google gives back free WiFi

Google’s New York offices are located in the lower Manhattan neighborhood of Chelsea, and today Google announced free WiFi would be provided to the area.

Expected WiFi coverage area for Free Chelsea WiFi
Expected WiFi coverage area for free Google WiFi in the Chelsea neighborhood.

 
The image above attempts to map the coverage area described as:

“Gansevoort Street and 19th Street, from 8th Avenue to the West Side Highway including the Chelsea Triangle, 14th Street Park, and Gansevoort Plaza”

After 6 years of working in the neighborhood Google was proud to offer free WiFi to the area which has a very high density of students (5,000+) and full time residents.

U.S. Senator Charles Schumer, and Google’s CIO, Ben Fried, got together to make the announcement in public at 10:30 AM EST.

Given the technical nature of the area’s residents, the free Wifi offering should help pull in more tech companies with similar goals.

I know that if Google wanted to give me free internet, I’d gladly take that $60/month savings, and they are offering this to nearly 10,000 residents/businesses?!

You go Google!

Charged up about Bluetooth Batteries

Tethercell

Have you ever wanted to:
- know the charge level of installed batteries
- remotely turn on/off something battery powered
- get a warning when your fire alarm battery is low

Well now you can take control of anything that uses AA batteries, using an iPhone, and later on this will obviously be available to your tablet, laptop, PC, or really anything with Bluetooth.

The Thethercell is a new product from two rocket scientists who actually worked on the SpaceX project.

It’s essentially a AAA battery holder with a AA battery’s dimensions. The holder also has a low-power Bluetooth radio/controller chipset, which allows the battery to be checked, and turned off and on remotely.

Here’s a couple examples I’ve seen that give some idea of uses :

- install in a Click-Light
- put the Click-Light in the garage
- set the Tethercell to ‘auto-on’
- tether to your cell phone
- now you have automatic lighting

Tethercell with battery installed.

- install in a baby monitor
- set low battery alarm
- set timer for on/off periods
- spy on people during certain hours
- batteries will last much longer

- install in an old music player
- tether to a device with motion sensor
- play white noise on the music player
- when motion stops the player switches off
- attach the device to your bed/pillow
- white noise will play until you fall asleep

Since this is a fresh product, still in the ‘prototype’ phase, I’d expect lots more ideas on uses to pop up in the future.

In fact I could see companies which use a lot of batteries looking at this as the ultimate in cost cutting/waste management options. The entry point is minimal, and the product itself is likely to be less than $10/each once the economy of scale has taken effect.

SEO news blog post by @ 11:48 am on January 8, 2013


 

The Wi-Fi Microwave Renaissance

For financial services firms, the ability to get a piece of competitive financial data a few milliseconds before you competition is worth the cost of securing a fast internet connection. Despite being in use for over half a century, the once stagnant microwave communications industry is seeing a renaissance recently.
steampunk internet

Since July 2012, Quincy Data has been broadcasting as a microwave provider between New York and Chicago, providing financial sectors with a competitive edge. When Quincy Data applied for their licensing with the FCC in 2010, there was only one other company that had submitted a similar request; now there are dozens of other carriers waiting in the wings, eager to have their requests ratified.

Microwave technology uses point-to-point networks and have been used for decades by the military and broadcast television stations. Microwave transmissions operate in the 1 to 30 GHz portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Although they do need a line of site between transmission points, signals can be repeated along the way and can travel up to 300 kilometers.

microwave transmission diagram

More recently, the push has been towards fiber optics connections, which have the ability to offer greater bandwidth. Current limitations of microwave transmissions can only offer 150Mbps, but developers are currently developing gigabit microwave technologies.

Fiber optics carry data on light waves passing through glass tubes and are therefore constrained to the maximum speed of the medium through which it passes. Light travels at a scant 200,000 km per second compared to an electromagnetic wave that can travel at 300,000km per second in a vacuum.

The other distinct advantage of microwave technology is that the transmission distances tend to be much shorter than that of fiber optics, since it is much easy to transmit in a direct path between two points rather than snaking fiber optic cabling through existing infrastructure to obtain an optimal path.

Performance is still a big factor into the adoption of microwave technologies en masse. Rain can affect performance, as well as low-lying clouds and various forms of interference. This is becoming more problematic today with so many wireless communications bombarding our cities. Once latency times have been reduced, microwave vendors will sell their service based upon the robustness of their networks.

My Two Cents:

Sample PLN Network
A better application of microwave technology would be to broadcast into remote rural areas in order to provide free access to the internet. Internet access has been deemed to be a basic human right according to the UN.

Similar initiatives have been introduced in Canada in the past with the Provincial Learning Network (PLN) in an attempt to bring internet access to remote schools. However, the cost of developing modern wireless infrastructures into remote areas is far too prohibitive.

Many communities still have entrenched infrastructures that would support microwave communications proving that this is not only a feasible strategy, but that it is also a cost effective means to provide free Internet access to all.

SEO news blog post by @ 11:33 am on December 12, 2012

Categories:IT Industry,Technology

 

Thinking of making an ‘App’ for the Apple Store?

You may want to re-think that decision, perhaps even focus on a ‘mobile’ provider for your site, or an Android app instead of one for Apple’s store.

Rotten Apple with bite mark

Why? Well lets list the reasons:

- Android OS is shipping on more phones currently than any other mobile OS
- 2013 should be the year that Android overtakes iPhone in subscriber #s
- A mobile ‘face lift’ should load on any phone/browser
- Apple is cracking down on all ‘Apps’ that generate revenue outside their store..

The last one is a real kicker, especially for Microsoft who is currently unable to update their SkyDrive app after Apple realized it was handling in-app purchases without going through the Apple Store.

Essentially Apple is rejecting all Microsoft app updates and 3rd party apps that communicate with SkyDrive until Microsoft has a solution to Apple’s need for a 30% cut of all transactions done through it’s App Store.

So if you made an Apple Store ‘App’ for your site, all you can do with the ‘App’ is browse information and provide free resources, since any attempt to engage in a financial transaction would require the Apple App Store to participate, at a 30% margin.

That’s just.. wait for it.. rotten.

Making Easy Money by Ignoring Copyright Infringement

A North Korean Won with Park Jae-sang's face.

On the surface, it may seem counter-intuitive to your profit margin, but not letting people steal your content could be what’s stopping you from getting rich.

PSY, the chubby Korean behind the most popular YouTube video to-date, is raking in the profits from his ‘Gangnam Style’ video, and it’s all because he didn’t censor his own work by chasing copyright violations.

If you look at TV commercials, ad revenue, product endorsements, and other direct revenue from his popularity, PSY is making over $8 Million in 2012 alone.

Clearly there’s a trade off between copyrights and profits that doesn’t favor always locking down your content.

I’m wondering though, once fame has taken hold, if next year we’ll have a story about PSY suing people for copyright infringements?

SEO news blog post by @ 12:59 pm on December 11, 2012


 

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