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Beanstalk's Internet Marketing Blog

At Beanstalk Search Engine Optimization we know that knowledge is power. That's the reason we started this Internet marketing blog back in 2005. We know that the better informed our visitors are, the better the decisions they will make for their websites and their online businesses. We hope you enjoy your stay and find the news, tips and ideas contained within this blog useful.


March 27, 2012

Google IO is a sellout

I know we’ve been anti-Google the last few weeks, but Google’s upcoming IO conference really did sell-out, in 20 mins no less!
GoogleIO 2012 Sold Out
With only 5,500 seats the 20 minute sell-out wasn’t too shocking, but the $2,000 EBay auction for a Google IO ticket took me by surprise. I tried to go find it for a confirmation picture but it was already nuked. Even at the full price of $900 a pop, the scalping price was over double! Heck educational admission ticket prices are only $300 each!?

If you’re wondering ‘what the heck is Google IO?’ that could be our fault, because our post about it last year, Ooh Shiny! ChromeOS & ChromeBook, was totally about the new ChromeBook and not the conference.. Oh man!

Each year Google hosts it’s Input/Output conference to not only share a vision of what’s ahead for Google, but also to get some feedback from the developers and users that work with Google’s solutions.

As is the case each year the team of nerds over at Google have put together a ‘chrome experiment‘ for anyone with a Google account.

The splash page for the Google IO event experiment teases us with the following:

“Brush up on your geometry, dust off your protractor, and architect a machine only you could have dreamt of. Join developers tackling our latest Chrome Experiment for a chance to have your machine featured at Google I/O.”

… yet the site seems a wee bit too popular at the moment, refusing to proceed into the actual site no matter how many times your click it. I’ll have to keep trying but right now it looks like I’ll have to come back and update after lunch.

If you REALLY wanted to click something to fiddle with in your browser, and it has to work right this second, well try Browser Quest from Mozilla Labs! While the game is currently still up and running I expect it will completely flat-line as it reaches peak popularity. I am running around as DobbieBobkins if you get in.

Browser Quest is an HTML5 site, with everything using the latest web-tech available. Don’t let those 8-bit graphics fool you, this is a modern technical demonstration. I’ve seen the game work with the latest versions of Chrome, Safari, Firefox, and Opera, just fine, though Opera was loading like dirt because of some broken plugins.

Speaking of coming back to things. I keep saying that we will have more on the Beanstalk Minecraft map contest, including some videos to inspire folks with ideas.. Sadly I am SO out of date with video capture that it boggles the mind.

Apparently my problem with recording is missing codecs, so I installed the FFdshow package which supposedly contains the right codecs to maintain the correct color space and gamma values in my source videos. If that sounded like Spanish, in a nutshell I’m fixing some dark video issues. :)

Here’s my last upload fresh off the preview screen, and it’s STILL TOO DARK?

http://vimeo.com/39291926

So, for now, today’s post is more of a bookmark, with some Google IO teasing, to be visited again after lunch when things are less popular. ;)

SEO news blog post by @ 1:38 pm


 

 

February 9, 2012

Are multiple rel=authors worth it?

Recently Google+ made it a lot easier for content authors to indicate the sites they publish to. Here’s a short clip showing that new easier process:

So that’s now told Google+ that you are an author for the sites you’ve listed. It also adds a backlink on your Google+ Profile page back to your site.

At this point, once Google has parsed the changes, and updated it’s caches, you’ll start to see author credits on articles with the same name and email address. While the Google help docs ‘suggest’ you have a matching email address published with each post, it’s clearly not a requirement.

So after this update you could start to see ‘published by you’ when doing searches on Google for posts you’ve made but what’s to stop anyone from claiming they wrote something on-line?

The other half of this process is creating a ‘rel=”author”‘ or ‘rel=”publisher”‘ link on the content pages on your blog/web site.

In the case of Beanstalk’s Blog, all posts get the same rel=”publisher” link, it looks like this (you can see it in ‘view-source’):

<link href="https://plus.google.com/115481870286209043075" rel="publisher" />

That makes Google see our blog posts as ‘published’ by our Google+ Profile, which is a bit ‘lazy’, but the process to add that code was very easy (and we blogged about it here) compared to the task of tagging each post with a custom link.

The truth is that there has to be some ‘ranking signal’ for multiple authors, and there should be a quality/trust grade based on the profiles of the authors. So what is that ‘factor’ that ‘has’ to be hiding in the ranking code? Great question!

Since we’ve already spent some time with Google+ and a single author source we intend to run some tests and prove out the value or lack of it. Our plans are to report on both the difficulty of applying the right tags to the proper posts, and then value of that effort. If anyone reading along has some good suggestions for the test process please drop us a comment via the main contact form.

Where’s Bart?

Chia Bart is retired for now. I need to find a decent webcam and then I’ll re-do him with some time-lapse for added thrills and joy. In the meantime we’re looking at offering the readers a really unique chance at interacting with the blog:

Each month we will be posting some macro images. Each one will be a challenge to figure out and we’ll take guesses on stuff ‘material’ ‘location’ ‘object’ etc.. and then we will rate the guesses based on how close they are. Technically, even if we had one guess like: “The picture for week 2 looks like glass”, that could win!

The best guess will get recognition on our blog and we’ll announce the best guess each month on Twitter as well.

This is the Macro image for Week two of FebruaryFebruary Macro 2 – If you think you know what this is, or where this is, send us your best guess via Twitter or G+

SEO news blog post by @ 12:14 pm


 

 

November 25, 2011

Another iFrames test

Back on November 7th Beanstalk’s Ryan Morben decided to run a test on iFrames to see how they get crawled (and to answer the question … do they?)  I had to support the test as we’d been receiving mixed signals.  A good clean test running an iFrame of our own domain containing only text.  The notion was … if a search for that unique string of text produced our page as a result then we know Google crawled it.

The result was interesting … the content got crawled but the ranking page wasn’t our blog post but rather the URL of the frame source itself.  It appears that Google treated the iFrame call as a link more than content on the page.

When we published the results I got an interesting email from Stefano: “I noticed the results of your iframe test showed that google did indeed index the unique phrase. Can you do another test where you load the phrase from a different domain ? Thanks!

My assumption to this question is “yes” based on the initial results however it’s definitely worth a test.  To that end we’re running two separate tests on this, the first we will be running here on the Beanstalk site with the following frame:

The second test location isn’t being released in this post just to make sure the process isn’t gamed.  I’d rather have slow or even no results than false positives.

Stay tuned – as soon as we have conclusive answers as to how it turns out, we’ll let you know.

And until then … enjoy the weekend !

EDIT: We will still be doing a follow-up post with more code examples, but we have results of the first test of iframe text crawling:

Service   Crawled? Indexed?
Bing   no no
Blekko   no no
DuckDuckGo   no no
Google   yes no
MajesticSEO   no no
Yahoo   no no
Yandex   yes no

Essentially this result is what we should have expected.

A search engine needs a crawler to understand the iframe syntax, and since a lot of iframe data is secure or private, there’s little motivation to go that extra mile, and it’s no surprise that the ones that do crawl the frame don’t publicly index the result since that’s just asking for privacy and other issues.

SEO news blog post by @ 4:02 pm

Categories:Code Tests

 

 

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