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Ripoff Report De-Indexed In Australia’s Yahoo!7

Ripoff Reportt De-Indexed In Australia.

Yahoo!7, the Australian version of Yahoo! has de-indexed RipoffReport.com. This news came to me from Janice Duffy (thanks Janice).

This move was brought on in part by the efforts of http://ripoffreport-victims-unite.org/ who have organized complains of those who feel that Ripoff Report does not enable those accused of wrongdoing to properly and effectively address the issue thus causing permanent harm.  Obviously this was effective, at least in Australia.

A Yahoo7 spokesperson discussing the issue with SearchEngineLand.com had the following to say:

“Yahoo7 has received significant complaints in regards to defamatory content in our search results which have been generated from links on the website ripoffreport.com. Under Australian law Yahoo7 has an obligation to remove defamatory content from our search results, when notified of it. Given the volume of complaints received in respect of the ripoffreport.com website, Yahoo7 has put in place measures to stop ripoffreport results appearing in Yahoo7 Search while we review our legal position.”

This is going to be a welcome precedent for in other locations that feel they are fighting a losing battle for their reputation after receiving a bad report.  It is fairly common to hear of issues RipoffReport being used purely to damage the reputation of someone without actual cause either by competitors or disgruntled individuals.

If nothing else, this illustrates a problem unique to the Internet and coupled with the EU ruling on the Right To Be Forgotten, reflects the shift of a significant amount of power from the engines to the users.

SEO news blog post by @ 7:00 am on May 21, 2014


 

Don’t farm the wrong email list..

I am a typist of sorts; I don’t dictate in a court of law, or even have good touch typing skills, but I honestly communicate via typing almost as much as I do with spoken words.

So I have a thing for nice keyboards and I made the mistake of trying out a new product, before it’d been thoroughly tested/reviewed: the Mionix Z60 mechanical keyboard.

It’s a really sturdy well built device with plenty of high end features that were what I wanted in a keyboard, however there were some critical problems with it that caused me to send it back a few times just to get a working unit.

Even after contacting the manufacturer’s support/warranty team on multiple occasions resulting in a few returns/replacements of the KB for one reason or the other I cannot reliably boot PCs with a mouse connected to the Mionix KB I finally ended up with, but I got tired of mailing things around so I just decided to live with the issues.

Yesterday, being April Fools, Dave snuck over to my PC and plugged my mouse into my KB. He already knew this would drive me nuts wondering what’s wrong with my computer till I noticed it and he was right! Curses!

So this morning, when I got 3 copies of a spam email, thanks to my numerous contact efforts, from Mionix advertising yet another crazy custom product, I laughed at the ‘day late’ April Fools joke, but seeing how they had three different email addresses due to my numerous support contact efforts, it was a good reminder:

“Do not send unsolicited advertising to the wrong email list.”

Unsolicited advertising to random people is bad enough, but to dump spam on some people who are frustrated and unhappy with their existing purchases is just reminding them to dislike you.


(Image credit: Terry Border – Bent Objects.)



… Unless you were so keen to get a brand mention that you intentionally contacted upset users hoping for backlash? In that case congrats. :)

SEO news blog post by @ 12:03 pm on April 2, 2014


 

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